Charitable names

I’ve always loved the Virtue names which were so popular in the Puritan world, though many of them are completely unused, or almost never used, in the modern era. One of those names is Charity. It’s not such a common name meaning in the West, but there are many charity-themed names in the Asian languages. Many of the names I discovered are Korean.

The Korean element Eun means “charity,” while Seon means “charitable.”

Unisex:

Eun can mean “charity” in Korean.

Eun-Jae means “charity talent” or “charity ability” in Korean.

Gyeong-Eun is composed of the Korean elements gyeong, which can mean “celebrate, congratulate” or “view, scenery,” and eun.

Hui-Seon is composed of the Korean elements hui and seon, which can mean, respectively, “like, love, enjoy, joyful thing” and “charitable, kind, virtuous, good.”

Ihsan is Arabic.

Jeong-Eun is composed of the Korean elements jeong, which can mean “court,” “chaste, loyal, pure,” or “upright, proper, straight,” and eun.

Min-Seon is composed of the Korean elements min, which can mean “clever, smart, fast, quick,” and seon.

Myeong-Eun is composed of the Korean elements myeong (clear, brilliant, light, bright) and eun.

Seon-Yeong is composed of the Korean elements yeong, which can mean “long, eternal, perpetual, forever,” or “project/reflect light,” and seon.

Female:

Caridad is Spanish.

Carita is Swedish. An alternate form is Karita.

Caritas is Latin.

Caritat is Catalan.

Charity last charted on the U.S. Top 1000 in 2013, when it was #970. Its most popular years were 1974 (#186) and 1975 (#183).

Da-Eun can mean “much charity” in Korean.

Eun-A means “elegant/graceful/refined charity” in Korean.

Eun-Bi can mean “charity rain” in Korean.

Eun-Byeol can mean “charity star” in Korean.

Eun-Chae roughly means “variegated colors of charity” in Korean.

Eun-Gyeong is composed of the Korean elements eun and gyeong, which in this name can mean “respect, honor” or “view, scenery.”

Eun-Hui is composed of the Korean elements eun and hui, which can mean “dim light, glimmer, warm, bright, ” “beauty,” or “delight, gladness, joy.”

Eun-Jae is composed of the Korean elements eun and jae, which means “ability, talent.”

Eun-Jeong can mean “charity court” or “pretty/graceful charity” in Korean.

Eun-Ji can mean “charity earth/ground/soil” or “charity wisdom/intellect” in Korean.

Eun-Ju is composed of the Korean elements eun and ju, which means “infinite time.”

Eun-Mi means “beautiful, pretty, pleasing charity” in Korean.

Eun-Seo is composed of the Korean elements eun and seo (auspicious, felicitous omen).

Eun-Suk is composed of the Korean elements eun and suk (charming, good, virtuous, pure).

Eun-Yeong can mean “charity hero,” “charity flower,” “brave charity,” and “charity flower” in Korean.

Ga-Eun is composed of the Korean elements ga (delightful, auspicious, good, beautiful) and eun.

Ha-Eun is composed of the Korean elements ha, which can mean “big, grand, great, summer” or God, and eun.

Hye-Seon is composed of the Korean elements hye (confer kindness, benefit, favor) and seon.

Jae-Eun is composed of the Korean elements jae (ability, talent) and eun.

Ji-Eun can mean “branch of charity,” “know/comprehend/perceive charity,” and “will/purpose/ambition of charity” in Korean.

Karitász is Hungarian.

Karitez is Breton.

Na-Eun means “elegant/delicate/graceful charity” in Korean.

Niko can mean “charity child” in Japanese.

Su-Eun means “refined/graceful/elegant charity” in Korean.

Ye-Eun is composed of the Korean elements ye (praise, reputation, fame) and eun.

Yoshina can mean “charitable apple tree” in Japanese.

Yuci is a rare Chinese name which can mean “charitable house” if it’s female. As a male name, it has much different possible meanings.

Yuniko is a Japanese name composed of the elements yu (reason), ni (charity), and ko (child).

Male:

Akihito can mean “bright charity” in Japanese.

Eun-Gwang is composed of the Korean elements eun and gwang (shine, brilliant, light, only).

Fumihito can mean “perfume of charity” or “chronicle of charity” in Japanese.

Jinnosuke can mean “to concern oneself with charity” in Japanese. Though it was very popular from the Edo Period (1603–1868) through the Meiji Period (1868–1912), it’s very rare today.

Khayri means “charitable” in Arabic.

Kunio can mean “long-time charity” in Japanese.

Seon-Gil is composed of the Korean elements seon and gil. The latter element means “good, propitious, lucky.”

Seon-U can mean “charitable feather/wings/plume,” “charitable house,” or “charitable friend” in Korean.

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