The Vs of Ukrainian names

Male names:

Vakula is the Ukrainian form of the Greek name Boukolos (cowherd, herdsman). This is the name of the protagonist in Nikolay Gogol’s 1832 folk mystic story “The Night Before Christmas.” Another form of the name is Vukol.

Valentyn is the Ukrainian form of Valentine, which comes from Roman cognomens Valentinus and Valens (strong, healthy, vigourous).

Valentynian is a rare form of the Roman cognomen Valentinianus, which is also related to Valentine.

Vasyl is the Ukrainian form of Basil, which comes from Greek name Basileios and word basileus (king).

Vavyla is the Ukrainian form of the Greek name Babylas (i.e., Babylon).

Vladyslav means “to rule in glory.”

Volodymyr is the original form of Vladimir (famous rule).

Volodyslav is a variant form of Vladyslav.

Vyktor is a lesser-used form of Viktor (victor, conqueror).

Female names:

Valentyna is the Ukrainian form of Valentina.

Vasylyna is the Ukrainian form of the Russian name Vasilisa, an uncommon feminine form of Basil.

Veronyka is a rare form of Veronika, which derives from the Greek name Pherenike (bringing victory). The spelling was first altered to Berenice in Latin, from the Macedonian form Berenike, and then to Veronica, because of the ecclesiastical phrase vera icon (true image).

Vira is the Ukrainian form of Vera (faith).

Vivdya is a folk form of the Greek name Eudokia (Eudocia in Latin), which derives from roots eu (good) and eudokeo (to be satisfied, to be well pleased).

Vladyslava means “to rule in glory.”

2 thoughts on “The Vs of Ukrainian names

  1. Pingback: A to Z Reflections 2022 | Onomastics Outside the Box

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