Glorious names

While many people are familiar with the name Gloria (reportedly first used in 1891 in E. D. E. N. Southworth’s novel of the same name), there are a number of other names whose meanings relate to the words “glory” and “glorious.” To condense this post’s wordcount somewhat, I’m leaving out all the Slavic names with the element (-)slav(a). I do intend to have future posts showcasing all the Slavic names with the roots Mir(a), Mil(a), and Slav(a)!

Unisex:

Chidiebube means “God is glorious” in Igbo.

Hadar means “splendour, glory” in Hebrew.

Jaswinder means “glory of Indra” or “Indra’s glory” in Sanskrit.

Jeong-Hui can mean “proper and glorious” and “gentle and glorious” in Korean.

Ji-Yeong can mean “wisdom and glory,” “intellect and glory,” and “to know glory” in Korean.

Rong can mean “glory” in Chinese. I obviously wouldn’t recommend this in an Anglophone country!

Vinh means “glory” in Vietnamese.

Female:

Aegle is the Latinized form of the Greek Aigle, which means “glory, light, radiance.”

Aintza means “glory” in Basque.

Cleopatra is the Latinized form of the Greek Kleopatra, which means “glory of the father.” This spelling is used in English, Italian, Dutch, and Spanish, and Kleopatra is used in German, Greek, and the Slavic languages. Other forms include Kleópatra (Icelandic), Cléopâtre (French), Cliupatra (Sicilian), Clèopatra (Catalan), Cléopatra (Portuguese), and Kleopátra (Hungarian).

Gloria means “glory” in Latin. The name is used in English, Italian, Spanish, and German. It was in the Top 100 in the U.S. from 1922–63. Alternate forms are Glória (Portuguese), Gloría (Icelandic), and Glòria (Catalan).

Gloriana is an elaborated form of Gloria. I’ve always loved this name.

Glorinda means “worthy of glory” in Esperanto.

Glory is a rare English name.

Kleio means “glory” in Greek. She’s the Muse of history and heroic poetry, and introduced the alphabet to the Greek people. The Latinized and Italian form is Clio.

Nani means “glory, beauty” in Hawaiian.

Siriporn is a Thai name derived from the elements sir (glory, splendour) and phon (blessing). For obvious reasons, I’d steer far clear of this one in an Anglophone country! The “porn” element is pronounced POHN, but the spelling is still what it is.

Theokleia means “glory of God” in Ancient Greek. Other forms include Thekla (modern Greek, German), Tekla (Russian, Polish, Georgian, Scandinavian, Hungarian), Thècle (French), Tegla (Welsh), Tecla (Spanish, Italian), Thecla (Dutch), Tîgdlak or Tîgdlat (Greenlandic), Dekla (Latvian), Fee’la (Sami), Tekle (Georgian variation), and Teklė (Lithuanian).

Yocheved means “God is glory” in Hebrew. This was the name of the mother of Moses (Moshe), Aaron (Aharon), and Miriam.

Male:

Amjad means “more glorious” in Arabic.

Androcles is the Latinized form of the Greek Androkles, which means “glory of a man.”

Aristocles is the Latinized form of the Greek Aristokles, which means “best glory.”

Baha means “glory, splendour” in Arabic and Turkish.

Byeong-Ho can mean “glorious and vast” and “glorious summer” in Korean.

Damocles is the Latinized form of the Greek Damokles, which means “glory of the people.”

Diokles means “glory of Zeus” in Greek.

Euclid is the Anglicized form of the Greek Eukleides, which means “good glory.”

Hercules is the Latinized form of the Greek Herakles, which means “glory of Hera.” I discussed this name in depth here.

Ichabod means “no glory” in Hebrew.

Izzet means “glory, might” in Turkish.

Kleisthenes means “glory and strength” in Greek.

Kleon means “glory” in Greek.

Majid means “glorious” in Arabic.

Patroklos means “glory of the father” in Greek. This was the name of the great hero Achilles’s best friend, who may or may not have been his lover.

Perikles means “exceedingly glory” in Greek.

Pratap means “glory, splendour, heat” in Sanskrit.

Themistokles means “glory of the law” in Greek.

Thucydides is the Latinized form of the Greek Thoukydides, which means “son of God’s glory.”

Yash means “glory, fame, praise” in Sanskrit.

Yeong-Gi can mean “to begin glory” in Korean.

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Steely, metallic names

I recently discovered the History Channel’s series Forged in Fire, a reality show wherein four smiths compete to make the best weapon. Smithery and metallurgy are stereotypically male pursuits, but I’ve always been really proud of being very tomboyish.

It therefore wasn’t too much of a surprise that almost all of the names I found with meanings relating to steel, metal, iron, copper, and bronze are male names. Many of these names are also Mongolian or from Turkic languages.

Female:

Aenea means “bronze” or “copper” in Latin. This was possibly also created as a feminine form of Aeneas, which means “praise.”

Aramita is a Spanish name possibly derived from the Latin aramen, and ultimately aeramen, which means “copper, bronze.”

Kaneru means “bronze” in Japanese.

Male:

Batbold means “bold steel” in Mongolian.

Berbolat is a Chechen name derived from the Turkish military title bek (or beg), which means “master, chieftain,” and the Turkic element bolat (or bulat), which means “steel,” and ultimately derives from the Persian pulad.

Bolat means “steel” in Kazakh.

Çelik means “steel” in Turkish.

Chuluunbold means “stone steel” in Mongolian.

Demir means “iron” in Turkish.

Elidur is an archaic Welsh name, the first element of unknown etymology, and the second probably derived from dur (steel). In the 19th century, the name was resurrected as Elidor.

Ferruccio means “little iron” in Italian.

Ganbaatar means “steel hero” in Mongolian.

Ganbold means “steel steel” in Mongolian.

Gansükh means “steel axe” in Mongolian.

Gantulga means “steel hearth” in Mongolian.

Ganzorig means “steel courage” in Mongolian.

Gobán possibly means “little smith” in Irish.

Goibniu means “smith” in Irish. He was a smith god, and provided weapons for the Tuatha De Danann.

Hephaestus is the Latinized form of the Greek Hephaistos, the god of fire, forging, and metallurgy. He was also a fellow limper.

Ilmarinen is a Finnish name which partly derives from ilma (air). He’s an immortal smith in Finnish mythology, and the creator of the sky and the magic mill Sampo.

Kaneki can mean “metal tree” in Japanese.

Kañ-ool means “steel boy” and “steel son” in Tuvan, a Turkic language spoken in south-central Siberia.

Khurşӑ means “steel” in Chuvash, a Turkic language spoken in central Russia.

Nurbolat is a Kazakh name composed of the elements nur (light) and bolat (steel).

Pola means “steel” in Kurdish.

Rentarou can mean “son of thick smelt metals” in Japanese.

Shoiynbai means “made of steel” in Kazakh.

Solon possibly means “lump of iron” in Greek.

Ståle means “steel” in Norwegian. The original Old Norse version was Stáli.

Talos was a bronze-winged automaton in Greek mythology, given to Europa for protection against invaders and pirates.

Temujin means “of iron” in Mongolian.

Timur is derived from the Turkic name Temür (iron), and is used in Uzbek, Kazakh, Tatar, Chechen, and Russian.

Tömörbaatar means “iron hero” in Mongolian.

Trahaearn means “very much like iron” in Welsh.

Tunç means “bronze” in Turkish.

Tuncay means “bronze Moon” in Turkish.

Yerbolat roughly means “steel male” or “male of steel” in Kazakh.

Zhelyazko means “iron” in Bulgarian.

Tantalus and Tethys

Tantalus, by Gioacchino Assereto, 1630s–40s

Tantalus (Tantalos) is a son of Zeus, great-grandpap of Agamemnon and Menelaus, and possibly a real historical figure. He was the ruler of an Anatolian city named Tantalis, Tantalos, or Sipytos. A port was named for him, and the city had a fairly well-known sepulchre of him.

Tantalus is claimed as Phrygian, sometimes the King of Phrygia, though his city was in the western part of Anatolia, where the kingdom of Lydia emerged. Since his son Pelops is called Pelops the Lydian, Tantalus may have belonged to a pre-kingdom royal family of Lydia.

Like the ungrateful Ixion, Tantalus too was invited to Zeus’s table by Mount Olympus. Tantalus wasn’t a very good guest, and stole the immortality-granting ambrosia. He brought it back to his people, and revealed the deities’ secrets.

Le Festin Donné aux Dieux par Tantale, Hugues Taraval, 1767

His misbehaviour didn’t end there. Tantalus sacrificed his own son Pelops, cutting him up and boiling him, and served him by a banquet for the deities. The Divine attendees found out just what was on the menu, and refused to touch it. Demeter, however, was so distraught over the loss of her daughter Persephone, she absentmindedly ate part of the shoulder.

Clotho, one of the Fates, resurrected Pelops on orders from Zeus. She collected the body parts and boiled them in a sacred cauldron, and rebuilt the shoulder with an ivory replacement made by Hephaestus and presented by Demeter. Pelops grew up to be very handsome, and Poseidon taught him how to use chariots. Sadly, Zeus punished him for the sins of his father, and kicked him out of Olympus.

Tantalus was forced to stand in a pool of water under a fruit tree with low-hanging branches. When he tried to pick fruit, the branches moved away from his grasp. Likewise, when he knelt to take a drink, the water receded. A threatening stone towered above his head.

In another version, Tantalus was blamed for stealing a golden dog Hesphaestus made to watch over the infant Zeus, who was hiding from his father Kronos. Tantalus’s friend Pandareus had really stolen the dog and given it to him for safekeeping, but when Pandareus asked him to return it, Tantalus denied he either had it or had seen it. Other versions depict Tantalus as the one who stole the dog and gave it to Pandareus.

Tantalus may be derived from Talantalos, “who has to bear much.” It’s related to talas, “wretched.” The English word “tantalize/tantalise” comes from his name.

Copyright Bernard Gagnon

Tethys is a Titan, the daughter of Gaia and Uranus, wife and sister of Titan Oceanus (Divine personification of the sea), and mother of the 3,000 river gods and the 3,000 Oceanid sea nymphs. Mythology obviously doesn’t operate under the normal scientific facts of conception, pregnancy, and childbirth!

According to one tradition, Tethys and Oceanus, not Gaia and Uranus, are the parents of the Titans. This may, however, be a misunderstanding of context and intent. Oceanus possibly was referred to as “from whom the gods are sprung” on account of how many river gods he sired, and Tethys may have been called “mother” due to her role as Hera’s foster mother.

Copyright Nevit Dilmen, GFDL, Creative Commons CC-BY 2.5

While Zeus was overthrowing his father Kronos, his mother Rhea took Hera to Tethys and Oceanus for safekeeping. They were very loving, attentive foster parents. Later on, Hera helped to reconcile the couple after an argument and resulting cessation of sexual relations.

Out of love for Hera, Tethys forbade the nymph Callisto (yet another of Zeus’s conquests) from touching the ocean after she was turned into a bear and placed in the sky as the constellation Ursa Major. This constellation never sets below the horizon.

One of Saturn’s moons, discovered in 1684, is named after Tethys.

Tethys is derived from tethe, “grandmother.” Other sources, however, believe her name was derived from that of the Mesopotamian goddess Tiamat, due to parallels between their stories. Tiamat possibly is derived from the Greek and Akkadian words for “sea,” and a cognate of the Northwest Semitic word tehom (the deeps, abyss). Tethys was identified with the sea, and her name was used as a poetic term for it.

These names are going to the birds!

We’re probably all familiar with bird names like Robin and Lark, but what about some of the lesser-used bird names?

Unisex:

Agpa means “thick-billed Murre” (a type of bird) in Greenlandic.

Alaryn means “bird” in Welsh. This was more commonly used than Aderyn in the mid-20th century, during heavy immigration in the U.K.

Chim means “bird” in Vietnamese.

Jiguur means “bird” in Mongolian.

Manu means “bird” in Maori and Hawaiian.

Palila is the name of a bird in Hawaiian, Tahitian, and Polynesian.

Tairo means “little bird” in Arabic.

Tori means “bird” in Japanese.

Tui is a type of Maori bird.

Tziquin means “bird” in Tzeltal and Quiche-Kaqchikel.

Vireo is a type of U.S. bird.

Yonah means “dove” in Hebrew.

Female:

Aderyn means “bird” in Welsh. This is contemporary, not traditional.

Aëdon may mean “nightingale” in Greek.

Aerope may derive from an Ancient Greek word for the bee-eater bird.

Aghavni means “dove” in Armenian. I love this name.

Ainara means “swallow (bird)” in Basque.

Alondra means “lark” in Spanish.

Andlib, or Andleeb, means “nightingale” in Persian.

Asuka is a Japanese name which is composed of the elements asu (“to fly” or “tomorrow”) and ka (bird). Many other meanings are also possible.

Aquila means “eagle” in Latin. The Russian form is Akilina.

Balbala means “nightingale” in Pashto.

Chipeta means “white singing bird” in Ute.

Cholena means “bird” in Lenape.

Columba means “dove” in Latin.

Deryn possibly comes from Aderyn, with the same meaning.

Durna means “crane (bird)” in Azeri.

Elaia means “swallow (bird)” in Basque.

Enara means “swallow (bird)” in Basque.

Faigel means “bird” in Yiddish. Other forms include Faiga and Faigie. Beyond my frequent dislike of many Yiddish names, I’m not fond of this one because it looks too much like a certain homophobic slur. As a matter of fact, the diminutive form Faigeleh is indeed slang for a gay man!

Homa is a phoenix-like bird in Persian mythology. An alternate form is Huma.

Inyoni means “bird” in Zulu.

‘Iwalani means “heavenly frigate bird” or “heavenly man-of-war bird” in Hawaiian.

Karawek means “bird” in Thai.

Karlygash means “swallow (bird)” in Kazakh.

Kasika means “bird” in Thai.

Kayäkki means “bird” in Chuvash, a native Siberian language.

Kiya means “cooing of a bird” in Sanskrit.

Kría is a type of Icelandic bird.

Lóa means “golden plover” in Icelandic and Faroese.

Lushanya may mean “songbird” in Chickasaw.

Oanh means “oriole” in Vietnamese.

Paloma means “dove, pigeon” in Spanish.

Parastou means “swallow (bird)” in Persian.

Pëllumb means “dove” in Albanian.

Prinia is the Javanese word for a type of bird.

Sacagawea may mean “bird woman” in Hidatsa.

Sarika means “myna bird” in Sanskrit.

Seelasat means “oriole” in Vainakhish, an extinct language of North Transcaucasia.

Shakuntala means “bird” in Sanskrit.

Simurg means “eagle bird” in Pahlavi. This was a monstrous bird in Persian mythology.

Svala means “swallow (bird)” in the Scandinavian languages.

Toiba means “dove” in Yiddish.

Tsubame can mean “swallow (bird)” in Japanese.

Tzipporah means “bird” in Hebrew. Other spellings include Zipporah, Tziporah, Tzipora, Tsippora, Tsipora, Cipora, and Cippóra.

Tzufit means “hummingbird” in Hebrew.

Ulara means “snowcock” in Kyrgyz.

Usoa means “dove” in Basque. The name Uxue is etymologically related.

Yemima means “dove” in Hebrew. The popular Anglicization is Jemima.

Zarka means “crane (bird)” in Pashto.

Zitkala means “bird” in Sioux.

Male:

Andor means “Thor’s eagle” in Norwegian.

Anzu was a Mesopotamian demon depicted in the form of a lion-headed eagle or a huge bird breathing water and fire.

Arnkætill means “bird helmet” in Old Norse.

Colum means “dove” in Old Irish.

Dalbar means “chick (baby bird)” in Yakut, a native Siberian language.

Dalbaray means “white bird” in Yakut.

Énna possibly means “bird-like” in Irish.

Jonah is the English form of Yonah, and a male-only name. Other forms include Jonas (Dutch, German, and Scandinavian, and the name of the heroic Dr. Jonas Salk), Giona (Italian), Yunus (Arabic and Turkish), Jonáš (Czech and Slovak), Iona (Russian and Georgian), Jónas (Icelandic), Joona and Joonas (Finnish), Jona (Serbian and Croatian), Jónás (Hungarian), Jonás (Spanish), Jonass (Latvian), and Jonasz (Polish).

Kaur means “loon (bird)” in Estonian.

Mochni means “talking bird” in Hopi.

Nenaa’angebi means “beautifying bird” in Ojibwe.

Örn means “eagle” in Icelandic, Swedish, and Old Norse.

Orneus may mean “bird, chicken” in Greek.

Ornytos may be etymologically related to the Greek word ornis (bird, chicken).

Pungat means “bird” in Nivkh, an indigenous language in Russia and Japan.

Quetzun is a Guatemalan name referring to a type of bird.

Sibaguchu means “birdman” in Mongolian.

Stari means “starling (bird)” in Old Norse.

Tayfur may mean “bird” in Bashkir.

Þrǫstr means “thrush (bird)” in Old Norse.

The many forms of Cecilia

Cecilia is one of my favoritest female names, the name I’ll use if I ever have a potential second daughter. I’ll be naming my first potential daughter Anastasiya Alice, but if there’s a #2, her name will be Cecilia Echo. My love for this name is due in large part to how that was the name of my third journal, whom I kept from 4 October 1993–25 January 1996. Cecilia remains my dearest journal, due to everything I went through when I was writing in her. I named her after the song.

Cecilia does mean “blind,” but it has such a beautiful sound, and St. Cecilia is the patron saint of music and musicians. Originally, the spelling Cecily was used after the Normans brought it to England. The Latinate spelling Cecilia came into popular use in the 18th century.

This spelling is used in English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Finnish, and the Scandinavian languages. The Hungarian, Slovak, and Portuguese version is Cecília, and the Icelandic version is Cecilía. Other forms include:

1. Cécile is French and Dutch.

2. Cecilie is Czech, Norwegian, and Danish. The last two vowels are pronounced separately, not together.

3. Caecilia is German, and the original Latin form. This spelling makes me think of caecilians, an aquatic amphibian that looks like a big worm. Some people keep them as pets. It’d be really cool on someone who keeps caecilians!

4. Cäcilie is German.

5. Cäcilia is another German form.

6. Sìleas is Scottish.

7. Cecylia is Polish.

8. Cecilija is Slovenian, Latvian, Lithuanian, and Croatian.

9. Tsetsiliya is Russian. As much as I adore Russian names, this just looks weird written out. It also calls to mind tsetse flies.

10. Síle is Irish. The most common Anglicization is Sheila.

11. Aziliz is Breton.

12. Cecía is Galician.

13. Kaikilia is Greek.

14. Kikilia is Hawaiian.

15. Kikil is Manx.

16. Icía is another Galician form.

17. Koikille is Basque.

18. Seljo is Sami, a native Siberian language.

19. Sesili is Georgian.

20. Sesselja is a lesser-used Icelandic form.

21. Tsetsilia is Georgian. I feel about this spelling the same way I do about the almost-identical Russian spelling.

22. Xixili is a rare Basque form.

23. Zëss is Luxembourgish.

24. Zezili is another Basque form.

25. Zezilia is Medieval Basque.

26. Zezilli is yet another Basque form.