Two or three letters only

Continuing the theme of short and sweet names, here are some with only two or three letters. While there’s some overlap with the previous post, there are a lot of new names here as well. These ones aren’t limited to a single syllable.

Also, once again, for the sake of relative brevity, there won’t be any Chinese, Korean, or Vietnamese names. Those languages have many lovely names, but if I included them, this post would be several thousand words, and in Chinese and Korean, there’s the issue of many possible meanings for a single name.

Unisex:

Adi (means “ornament, jewel” in Hebrew)
Bay
Ilo (means “delight, joy, happiness” in Estonian and Finnish; a female-only name in Estonian)
Lee
Li (means “to me” in Hebrew)
Mor (means “myrrh” in Hebrew)
Nur, Nor (means “light” in Arabic and Malay, respectively)
Or (means “light” in Hebrew)
Ori (means “my light” in Hebrew)
Raz (means “secret” in Hebrew)
Tal (means “dew” in Hebrew)
Tam (means “innocent, honest” in Hebrew)
Zen

Male:

Ali
Ami (means “my nation; my people” in Hebrew)
Ari (means “lion” in Hebrew)
Asa
Ash
Avi
Axl

Bo
Dax
Dov (means “bear” in Hebrew)
Eli
Fox
Gad (means “fortune, luck” in Hebrew)
Guy
Ian
Ira
Jay
Kai

Lee
Leo
Lev
Lon
Lot (means “covering, veil” in Hebrew; rhymes with the English word “smote”)
Luc
Max
Ner (means “lamp” in Hebrew)
Nir (means “plowed field” in Hebrew)
Om (the sacred Hindu sound)
Oz (means “strength” in Hebrew)

Ray
Rex
Roy
Uku (means “old man” in Estonian)
Ulf (means “wolf” in the Scandinavian languages)
Uri (means “my light” in Hebrew)
Van
Zed
Zev (means “wolf” in Hebrew)
Zvi (means “gazelle” in Hebrew)

Female:

Ada
Ama (means “born on Saturday” in Akan)
Amy
Ana
Ani
Ann
Ava
Aya

Dea (means “goddess” in Latin)
Dia (means “love” in African language Lembaama)
Eha (means “dusk” in Estonian)
Ela (means “hazel” [the colour] in Turkish)
Eos (means “dawn” in Greek)
Era (means “wind” in Albanian; also the Italian form of Hera)
Eva, Eve
Gem
Gia

Ia (means “violet” in Georgian)
Ida
Ila (means “earth” or “speech” in Sanskrit, “companion” or “associate” in Inuit)
Ina
Ino
Io
Ita
Iva
Ivy
Joy
Kay

Lea, Léa, Lia, Lya
Liv (from Old Norse Hlíf, “protection”; now associated with the modern Scandinavian word for “life”)
Luz
Mia
Nia
Noa
Nyx (means “night” in Greek)
Oda
Ora (means “light” in Hebrew)
Paz, Pax
Pia (means “pious, dutiful” in Latin)

Rae
Ria
Rue
Tia, Tea
Una (means “one” in Latin)
Zia
Zoe

One-syllable names

While some people gravitate towards long, flowery, ornate, multisyllabic names like Anastasia, Fiammetta, Leonardo, and Zachariah, others have a naming style which favours short, simple, and to the point. Towards that end, here are some names which fit the bill.

For the sake of relative brevity, I won’t be including Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese names. One-syllable names are the overwhelming rule in those languages, whereas they’re fairly less common in Indo–European languages.

Unisex:

Bay
Blake (I know this is traditionally male, but I was introduced to it through a female character on Guiding Light)
Dale
Drew
Lee
Quinn
Rain
Reese
Shai, Shay (means “gift” in Hebrew and completely separate from the male Irish name Shea/Shay)

Female:

Anne
Belle
Blaire
Blanche
Blythe
Bree, Brie
Brooke
Bryn, Brynn
Claire
Dawn
Dove
Eve

Faith
Fawn
Fay, Faye
Fern
Fleur
Gayle, Gail
Grace
Hope
Iynx (INKS), an obscure Greek love goddess. The English forms are Jynx and Jinx.
Jade
Jane
Jean, Jeanne
Jill
Joan
Joy
Joyce
June
Kay, Kaye

Lane
Lark
Leigh (Unlike the spelling Lee, this is female-only for me)
Love
Luz
Lynn, Lynne
Maeve
Maude
May, Mae
Nell
Paige
Peace
Pearl
Paz

Rae
Rose
Rue
Ruth
Sage
Skye (a name I can only picture on just the right person)
Sloane
Spring
Star
Tess
Wren

Male:

Ash
Beau
Blaine
Blaise
Brent
Brett
Bruce
Bryce

Cade
Chad
Chance
Chase
Clark, Clarke
Clay
Cliff
Clive
Clyde
Cole
Craig

Dean
Drake
Finn
Floyd
Flynn
Frank
Fritz
George
Gleb
Glenn
Grant
Guy

Hans
Heath
Hugh
Jack
James
Jay
John
Jude
Kai
Keith
Knox
Kurt
Kyle

Lance
Leif
Lev
Lloyd
Lorne
Luke, Luc, Luuk
Lyle
Mark, Marc
Max
Myles, Miles
Neil, Niall
Nils

Paul
Pierce
Ralph
Ray
Reid
Rex
Rhett
Rhys
Roy
Saul
Scott
Shane
Shea, Shay

Tate
Thane
Troy
Tzvi
Van
Vaughn
Wayne
Yves
Zed
Zeus (which I obviously wouldn’t recommend for a real human!)
Zev

2019 stats in review

Since WordPress quit offering their popular annual reports for one’s blogging stats, it’s fallen upon people to put such posts together ourselves. I really hate how they do away with features no one wanted to disappear!

My Top 10 most-viewed posts in 2019 were:

“Steely, metallic names,” published 23 June 2017, at 3,217 views. This is also my most-viewed post of all time.
“Apple names,” published 21 October 2017, at 2,103 views. This is my next-most-viewed post ever.
“Silvery, golden names,” published 26 June 2017, at 1,046 views. This is my fourth-most-viewed post ever.
“The many nicknames for Katherine,” published 8 February 2017, at 983 views. This is my third-most-viewed post of all time.
“Names with heart,” published 13 February 2017, at 831 views. This is my sixth-most-viewed post to date.
“Nocturnal names,” published 5 October 2016, at 719 views. This is my fifth-most-viewed post ever.
“The many forms of Mary, and its plethora of nicknames,” published 21 December 2017, at 634 views. This is my seventh-most-viewed post ever.
“The many forms of Esther,” published 10 March 2017, at 362 views. This is my tenth-most-viewed post ever.
“The many nicknames for Elizabeth,” published 6 February 2017, at 346 views. This is my ninth-most-viewed post ever.
“Pearly names (including the many forms of Margaret),” published 2 August 2017, at 305 views. This is my twelfth-most-viewed post to date.

My only all-time Top 10 post not in this year’s Top 10 is “Pumpkin names,” my eighth-most-viewed post ever, published 8 October 2017. This year, it was my sixteenth-most-viewed.

I remain glad I finally blacklisted a persistently chutzpahdik commenter in 2015. Everything she ever said was rude and dismissive, acting like I had no right to opinions differing from hers, let alone to express my own views on my own blog.

Witchy names, Part II

I’ve put together a list of words meaning “witch” which could work as personal names. As always, these don’t have to be used as human names. Some might work better on pets, fictional characters, dolls, or stuffed animals.

Amoosu is Igbo.

Boksi is Nepali.

Brucia is Corsican.

Bruixa is Catalan. See note below.

Bruja is Spanish. I obviously would NOT recommend using this in a Spanish-speaking country or place with many Spanish-speakers, but I rather like the sound of it. Perhaps it could work on a pet or stuffed animal.

Bruxa is Portuguese and Galician. Same caveat.

Daayan is Hindi.

Daina is Punjabi.

Dakana is Gujarati.

Jadokari is Georgian.

Jodugar is Uzbek.

Magissa is Greek.

Makutu is Maori.

Mantragatte is Telugu.

Mantravadi is Malayalam.

Matagati is Kannada, a language spoken in India.

Mayakariya is Sinhalese.

Mayya is Hausa, a Chadic language spoken in Africa.

Muroyi is Shona.

Noita is Finnish.

Polofiti is Samoan.

Ragana is Latvian and Lithuanian.

Saħħara is Maltese. To the best of my understanding, ħ seems to be like the guttural CH in loch and Chanukah.

Shulam is Mongolian.

Sorgina is Basque.

Strega is Italian feminine. The male form is Stregone.

Witika is Hawaiian.

A to Z Reflections 2018

This was my seventh year doing the A to Z Challenge, and my fifth with two blogs. I began doing it with this blog in 2014. Normally I have a much more intensive, scholarly theme than lists of names and their meanings, but I ended up without ample time to properly prepare for and put together the theme I’d been planning. Instead of forcing myself to write posts I knew wouldn’t represent my best possible work, I chose a fairly easy theme.

I waited till March to begin writing and researching my posts. By the time midnight rolled around on April first, I was only up to R. I powered through the remaining letters on April first, which perhaps set the tone for the entire rest of the Challenge. This may have been why it often felt like my heart wasn’t in it nearly to the extent it’s been during all previous years I’ve participated.

I’ve seen a few other people saying they also noticed participation seemed to be down this year, though there’s always the possibility we happened to visit the wrong blogs, or lucked out of posting our links to the daily lists at inopportune times of day. We don’t all have the same work, school, or sleep schedule, and so can’t all be early birds most likely to get noticed.

Though I most strongly preferred the old master list, I understand why the admins decided to retire it. If only there were a system that could make everyone happy, and that everyone finds the most user-friendly! I’m glad to know I’m not the only one who had some problems with scrolling on the Google Docs forms, and who found some problems with improper hyperlinking.

Post recap:

The As of Medieval names
The Bs of Medieval names
The Cs of Medieval names
The Ds of Medieval names
The Es of Medieval names
The Fs of Medieval names
The Gs of Medieval names
The Hs of Medieval names
The Is of Medieval names
The Js of Medieval names
The Ks of Medieval names
The Ls of Medieval names
The Ms of Medieval names
The Ns of Medieval names
The Os of Medieval names
The Ps of Medieval names
The Qs of Medieval names
The Rs of Medieval names
The Ses of Medieval names
The Ts of Medieval names
The Us of Medieval names
The Vs of Medieval names
The Ws of Medieval names
The Xes of Medieval names
The Ys of Medieval names
The Zs of Medieval names