2021 stats in review

I know I totally dropped the ball yet again and wasn’t nearly as consistent with posting in 2021 as I had hoped to be, apart from Blogging from A to Z April. My utmost apologies for not keeping to a more regular schedule and paying more attention to my primary blog, though my Dantean posts were my main focus in 2021 on account of the landmark septcentennial death anniversary year. I also had other things to preoccupy me.

Being the kind of oppositional, nonconformist person I am, I never make New Year’s resolutions, but I’d like to try to finally resume a more regular posting schedule here. Perhaps one post a week, at least. I still have a number of topics I’ve not yet gotten around to, and would love to hear readers’ suggestions.

My Top 10 most-viewed posts in 2021 were:

“Steely, metallic names,” published 23 June 2017, at 3,578 views in 2021 and 9,824 overall. This is still my most-viewed post of all time. (Always the ones you least suspect!)

“Doll and puppet names,” published 12 October 2020, at 3,539 views in 2021 and 3,593 overall. This has become my fifth-most-viewed post.

“The great and powerful Ing (and the names he spawned),” published 3 December 2017, at 2,374 views in 2021 and 4,103 overall. This has risen to become my third-most viewed post of all time.

“Apple names,” published 21 October 2017, at 1,917 views in 2021 and 6,199 overall. This is still my next-most-viewed post ever.

“Thor-inspired names,” published 23 February 2019, at 1,198 views in 2021 and 1,480 overall. Norse mythology has become very popular, particularly on account of the movies featuring Norse deities like Thor and Loki. This is now my tenth-most-viewed post.

“The many nicknames for Katherine,” published 8 February 2017, at 1,030 views in 2021 and 3,845 overall. This is my fourth-most-viewed post of all time.

“The many forms of Joshua,” published 21 November 2019, at 977 views in 2021 and 995 overall.

“Nocturnal names,” published 5 October 2016, at 875 views in 2021 and 2,717 overall. This is my sixth-most-viewed post ever.

“Dusty, screaming shrieking names,” published 12 October 2017, at 771 views in 2021 and 1,762 overall. This is still my ninth-most viewed post.

“Names with heart,” published 13 February 2017, at 734 views in 2021 and 2,067 overall. This slipped one position to become my eighth-most-viewed post to date.

Please let me know if there are any topics or names you’d like me to cover in 2022!

2020 stats in review

My utmost apologies for not posting in so long, and for not regularly posting as often as I used to. I’ve been focusing attention on a lot of other things, but I do hope to resume a more frequent schedule in 2021.

My Top 10 most-viewed posts in 2020 were:

“Steely, metallic names,” published 23 June 2017, at 1,864 views. This is still my most-viewed post of all time. (Always the ones you least suspect!)
“Apple names,” published 21 October 2017, at 1,796 views. This is also still my next-most-viewed post ever.
“The great and powerful Ing (and the names he spawned),” published 3 December 2017, at 1,553 views. This has risen to become my sixth-most viewed post of all time.
“The many nicknames for Katherine,” published 8 February 2017, at 1,054 views. This is my third-most-viewed post of all time.
“Nocturnal names,” published 5 October 2016, at 815 views. This is my fifth-most-viewed post ever.
“Silvery, golden names,” published 26 June 2017, at 733 views. This is my fourth-most-viewed post ever.
“Dusty, screaming shrieking names,” published 12 October 2017, at 518 views. This is now my ninth-most viewed post.
“Names with heart,” published 13 February 2017, at 408 views. This slipped one position to become my seventh-most-viewed post to date.
“The many forms of Anastasia,” published 13 March 2017, at 402 views.
“All about the names Edward, Edmund, and Edgar,” published 4 March 2018, at 366 views.

This year, two of my all-time Top 10 posts failed to make the year’s Top 10 posts:

“The many forms of Mary, and its plethora of nicknames,” published 21 December 2017, at 634 views. This is now my eighth-most-viewed post ever, and was my fourteenth-most-viewed post of 2020.
“The many nicknames for Elizabeth,” published 6 February 2017, at 290 views. This fell one slot to become my tenth-most-viewed post ever, and was this year’s thirteenth-most-viewed post.

Are there any particular types of posts you’d like to see in 2021? More general advice and opinion posts, international forms of names, names with certain meanings, names from specific languages, historic names?

Topics I already have planned include Arthurian names, Slavic names with the root mir (world, peace), names meaning “ginger” or relating to the word, and the issue of handling names for characters who speak a different language than yours (e.g., should they be common, unusual, or somewhere in between).

Doll and puppet names

Dolls and puppets have a long tradition in horror movies and stories. Who wouldn’t be frightened by a doll or puppet coming to life and committing deranged acts, particularly when that doll or puppet already looks really creepy and lifelike?

Aldjya (F) means “doll” in Kabyle, a Berber language of Algeria.

(F) means “doll” in Vietnamese.

Hiina (F) can mean “hina doll” in Japanese. This doll is displayed during the holiday Hinamatsuri (Doll’s Day or Girls’ Day), celebrated on 3 March and dating to at least 1625.

Hinako (F) can mean “doll child,” “doll happiness,” “doll rainbow,” and “doll chrysanthemum” in Japanese.

Hinari (F) can mean “doll pear” in Japanese. A lot of the Kanji used together in the same names seem rather strange to me, but it’s not my language to understand on a deep, personal level, even as a longtime Nipponophile. These Kanji combinations probably make perfect sense to the Japanese.

Kotohina (F) can combine Kanji for “doll” and koto (a musical instrument similar to a harp).

Mahina (F) can mean “real, genuine doll,” “dance doll,” and “fullness doll” in Japanese. This is also a Hawaiian name meaning “moon, month,” and the name of a Hawaiian lunar goddess, from Proto–Polynesian *masina.

Maňuška (F) means “puppet” in Slovak, though it’s usually only used as a nickname for Mária and Emanuela.

Nenetl (F) means “doll” in Nahuatl.

Poppet (U) is an extremely rare English name derived from Middle English popet (a small doll or child). I’ve only come across one real person (who lived to adulthood) with this name, Poppet John, daughter of Welsh painter Augustus John and second wife of Dutch painter Willem Jilts Pol.

Welf (M) means “puppet, whelp” in Medieval German.

Two or three letters only

Continuing the theme of short and sweet names, here are some with only two or three letters. While there’s some overlap with the previous post, there are a lot of new names here as well. These ones aren’t limited to a single syllable.

Also, once again, for the sake of relative brevity, there won’t be any Chinese, Korean, or Vietnamese names. Those languages have many lovely names, but if I included them, this post would be several thousand words, and in Chinese and Korean, there’s the issue of many possible meanings for a single name.

Unisex:

Adi (means “ornament, jewel” in Hebrew)
Bay
Ilo (means “delight, joy, happiness” in Estonian and Finnish; a female-only name in Estonian)
Lee
Li (means “to me” in Hebrew)
Mor (means “myrrh” in Hebrew)
Nur, Nor (means “light” in Arabic and Malay, respectively)
Or (means “light” in Hebrew)
Ori (means “my light” in Hebrew)
Raz (means “secret” in Hebrew)
Tal (means “dew” in Hebrew)
Tam (means “innocent, honest” in Hebrew)
Zen

Male:

Ali
Ami (means “my nation; my people” in Hebrew)
Ari (means “lion” in Hebrew)
Asa
Ash
Avi
Axl

Bo
Dax
Dov (means “bear” in Hebrew)
Eli
Fox
Gad (means “fortune, luck” in Hebrew)
Guy
Ian
Ira
Jay
Kai

Lee
Leo
Lev
Lon
Lot (means “covering, veil” in Hebrew; rhymes with the English word “smote”)
Luc
Max
Ner (means “lamp” in Hebrew)
Nir (means “plowed field” in Hebrew)
Om (the sacred Hindu sound)
Oz (means “strength” in Hebrew)

Ray
Rex
Roy
Uku (means “old man” in Estonian)
Ulf (means “wolf” in the Scandinavian languages)
Uri (means “my light” in Hebrew)
Van
Zed
Zev (means “wolf” in Hebrew)
Zvi (means “gazelle” in Hebrew)

Female:

Ada
Ama (means “born on Saturday” in Akan)
Amy
Ana
Ani
Ann
Ava
Aya

Dea (means “goddess” in Latin)
Dia (means “love” in African language Lembaama)
Eha (means “dusk” in Estonian)
Ela (means “hazel” [the colour] in Turkish)
Eos (means “dawn” in Greek)
Era (means “wind” in Albanian; also the Italian form of Hera)
Eva, Eve
Gem
Gia

Ia (means “violet” in Georgian)
Ida
Ila (means “earth” or “speech” in Sanskrit, “companion” or “associate” in Inuit)
Ina
Ino
Io
Ita
Iva
Ivy
Joy
Kay

Lea, Léa, Lia, Lya
Liv (from Old Norse Hlíf, “protection”; now associated with the modern Scandinavian word for “life”)
Luz
Mia
Nia
Noa
Nyx (means “night” in Greek)
Oda
Ora (means “light” in Hebrew)
Paz, Pax
Pia (means “pious, dutiful” in Latin)

Rae
Ria
Rue
Tia, Tea
Una (means “one” in Latin)
Zia
Zoe

One-syllable names

While some people gravitate towards long, flowery, ornate, multisyllabic names like Anastasia, Fiammetta, Leonardo, and Zachariah, others have a naming style which favours short, simple, and to the point. Towards that end, here are some names which fit the bill.

For the sake of relative brevity, I won’t be including Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese names. One-syllable names are the overwhelming rule in those languages, whereas they’re fairly less common in Indo–European languages.

Unisex:

Bay
Blake (I know this is traditionally male, but I was introduced to it through a female character on Guiding Light)
Dale
Drew
Lee
Quinn
Rain
Reese
Shai, Shay (means “gift” in Hebrew and completely separate from the male Irish name Shea/Shay)

Female:

Anne
Belle
Blaire
Blanche
Blythe
Bree, Brie
Brooke
Bryn, Brynn
Claire
Dawn
Dove
Eve

Faith
Fawn
Fay, Faye
Fern
Fleur
Gayle, Gail
Grace
Hope
Iynx (INKS), an obscure Greek love goddess. The English forms are Jynx and Jinx.
Jade
Jane
Jean, Jeanne
Jill
Joan
Joy
Joyce
June
Kay, Kaye

Lane
Lark
Leigh (Unlike the spelling Lee, this is female-only for me)
Love
Luz
Lynn, Lynne
Maeve
Maude
May, Mae
Nell
Paige
Peace
Pearl
Paz

Rae
Rose
Rue
Ruth
Sage
Skye (a name I can only picture on just the right person)
Sloane
Spring
Star
Tess
Wren

Male:

Ash
Beau
Blaine
Blaise
Brent
Brett
Bruce
Bryce

Cade
Chad
Chance
Chase
Clark, Clarke
Clay
Cliff
Clive
Clyde
Cole
Craig

Dean
Drake
Finn
Floyd
Flynn
Frank
Fritz
George
Gleb
Glenn
Grant
Guy

Hans
Heath
Hugh
Jack
James
Jay
John
Jude
Kai
Keith
Knox
Kurt
Kyle

Lance
Leif
Lev
Lloyd
Lorne
Luke, Luc, Luuk
Lyle
Mark, Marc
Max
Myles, Miles
Neil, Niall
Nils

Paul
Pierce
Ralph
Ray
Reid
Rex
Rhett
Rhys
Roy
Saul
Scott
Shane
Shea, Shay

Tate
Thane
Troy
Tzvi
Van
Vaughn
Wayne
Yves
Zed
Zeus (which I obviously wouldn’t recommend for a real human!)
Zev