The Rs of Medieval names

Unisex:

Razin (Moorish Arabic): “Composed, dignified, calm.”

Male:

Raduard (Dutch and French): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Radward, with Old High German roots rât (counsel) and wart (guard).

Rainfroy (French): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Raginfrid (peaceful advice), which in turn derives from Ancient Scandinavian name Ragnfríðr. Its roots are Gothic ragin (advice) and Old High German fridu (peace).

Rambaldo (Tuscan and Venetian Italian): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Ragimbald (bold advice), with roots ragin (advice) and bald (bold).

Ratimir (Slavic): “World battle” and “battle for peace,” from roots rati (battle, war) and miru (peace, world). This is still used in modern Croatian.

Razon (Moorish Arabic)

Redhar (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Hræiðarr (home army), with roots hreiðr (home, nest) and herr (army).

Redimir (Slavic): “Rare peace” and “rare world,” from Proto–Slavic root rěd’k’ (sparse, rare) and Slavonic mir (peace, world).

Rek, Rink (Danish): “Warrior,” from Ancient Scandinavian root rekkr.

Relictus (English): “Relinquished.” This name was often given to orphans.

Remedium (English)

Reyer (Dutch): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Reginher/Raganhar, with roots ragin (advice, counsel) and hari (army).

Rhain (Welsh): “Stretched-out” or “stiff.”

Rhiryd (Welsh)

Rinieri (Italian)

Robaldo (Italian): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Rotbald, whose other forms included Chrodobald, Hrodbald, Hrotbald, and Rodbald. Its roots are hrôthi (fame) and Old High German bald (brave, bold).

Rosten (Danish): Derived from Old Norse name Hróðstæinn (famous stone), with roots hróðr (fame) and steinn (stone).

Ruberto (Italian)

Ruggieri (Italian): Form of Roger (famous spear), from Ancient Germanic roots hrod (fame) and ger (spear).

Rustico (Italian): “Rural, rustic,” from Latin root rusticus. This is one of the protagonists of my all-time favourite Decameron story, its most famously dirty story.

Female:

Raha (Moorish Arabic): “Rest, comfort.”

Rahil (Judeo–Arabic): Form of Rachel (ewe).

Raimunda (Catalan): Feminine form of Raymond, derived from Ancient Germanic name Raginmund. Its roots are ragin (advice) and mund (protector). The Occitan form was Raymunda.

Rametta (English)

Ravenilda (English): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Hrafnhildr (battle raven), with roots hrafn (raven) and hildr (battle).

Raziya (Arabic)

Redigon (Cornish and English): Form of Ancient Germanic name Radegund/Radgund (war counsel), from Old High German roots rât (counsel) and gund (war).

Regelinda (German and Slavic): Derived from Ancient Germanic roots regin (counsel, advice) and lind (linden tree, lime, lime wood shield; soft, gentle).

Regna (Danish): Nickname for names starting in Ragin (advice, counsel).

Reinika, Renika (Swedish): Nickname for names starting in Ragn (counsel, advice).

Reyna (English): Form of Regina (queen). The spelling was influenced by Old French word reine.

Rhainfellt (Welsh): Derived from roots rhiain (maiden; originally “queen”) and mellt (lightning).

Rigmár (Danish): Derived from Old High German name Ricmot, with roots rīhhi (distinguished, rich, mighty) and muot (courage; excitement, concern, wrath).

Rima (Moorish Arabic): “White antelope.”

Rixenda (Occitan). The French form was Rixende.

Rohese, Rohesia (English): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Hrodohaidis, with roots hrod (fame) and heid (sort, kind, type).

Rossia (English)

Rubea (Occitan)

Rumayla (Arabic)

Rusha, Rusa (Arabic)

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The Qs of Medieval names

Female:

Quena (English): “Woman,” from Old English root cwén.

Queneva, Queniva (English): Derived from Old English name Cwengifu (Woman gift), from roots cwen and gifu.

Quenilda, Quenilla (English): Derived from Old English name Cwénhild, with roots cwén (wife, woman) and hild (battle, war).

Male:

Qays (Moorish Arabic): “To compare, to measure.”

Quieton (Czech): Possibly related to Quentin (fifth), from Latin root quintus.

The Ns of Medieval names

Male:

Nabar (Basque): Possibly from the Basque word for “multi-coloured,” and/or inspired by the name of Spain’s Navarre region. The feminine form was Nabarra.

Nafni (Danish): Either from Old Norse word nafn (name), or nafni (namesake).

Nanker (German)

Nosimir (Slavic): “To carry peace” and “to carry the world,” from Proto–Slavic root nositi (to bear, to carry, to wear, to bring) and mir (world, peace).

Nosislav (Slavic): “To carry glory,” from roots nositi and slav.

Nudimir (Slavic): Possibly “to intimidate the world,” from Old Church Slavonic root nuditi (to plague, to force, to intimidate), and mir.

Nymandus (German): Latinization of German word niemand (nobody). This was a common name for orphans (esp. infants), who “belonged to nobody.”

Female:

Nalkah (Arabic)

Namja (Judeo–Arabic)

Napoleona (Italian): Possibly derived from the city of Napoli (Naples), or the name of the German Nibelungenleid epic.

Nicolosa, Niccolosa (Italian): Feminine form of Nicholas (victory of the people), from Greek roots nike and laos. This is the name of a Decameron character, in one of the stories Geoffrey Chaucer later plagiarized in The Canterbury Tales. (The persistently chutzpahdik troll I finally blacklisted sniped at me when I mentioned this before. It wasn’t the first or last time she called my opinions ridiculous.)

Nofra (Catalan and Italian): Probably a feminine form of Catalan Noffre and Italian Nofri, and thus ultimately descended from Humphrey/Hunfrith (peaceful warrior).

Nomidia (German)

Nusayba (Arabic): “Fitting, appropriate, proper.”

The Ms of Medieval names

Female:

Madiana (Italian)

Madolina (Italian): Probably a form of Magdalena.

Madore (Italian)

Madrona (Spanish, Catalan): “Lady,” from Latin word matrona.

Magnifica (Italian): “Magnificent, excellent, splendid.”

Malmfred (Scandinavian)

Malore (Italian)

Marquessa (Spanish): “Marquise,” from Old French marchis and markis. The ultimate root is the Old High German word marka (fortified area along a border; march).

Marsibilia (Italian)

Mascarose (Occitan)

Massaria (Italian)

Massipa (Judeo–Catalan): Derived from Christian Catalan surname Massip/Macip, from Latin word mancipium (learner, servant, younger).

Maymuna (Moorish Arabic): “Blessed, prosperous, thriving.”

Melior (English): “Better,” from a Latin word with that meaning. The modern form is Meliora.

Melisende (French): Form of Millicent, derived from Ancient Germanic name Amalasuintha. Its roots are amal (labour, work) and swinth (strong).

Memorantia (English and Dutch): “Remembering,” from the Latin word.

Merewen, Merwenn, Merewynn (English): “Famous joy,” from Old English name Mærwynn. Its roots are mær (famous) and wynn (joy).

Merilda (English): Form of Old English name Mærhild.

Midonia (Italian)

Militsa (Slavic): “Gracious,” from root milu. It was originally a nickname for names beginning in Mil-. Its modern form is Milica (Slovenian, Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian).

Mirea (Judeo–Catalan): “Myrrh,” from Ladino (Judeo–Spanish) mira; a variation of popular Catalan name Mira (notable); or a nickname for Miriam,

Mireti (Moorish Arabic)

Miriana (English)

Munisa (Arabic): This is also a modern Uzbek, Bosnian, and Tajik name.

Muscata (Italian): “Nutmeg.”

Mutayyam (Moorish Arabic): “Captive of love.”

Muzna (Moorish Arabic): “Cloud, rain.”

Male:

Mechislav (Slavic): “Sword of glory,” from roots mechi and slava. The modern form is Mieczysław (Polish). The original form is a rare modern Russian name. Like all names ending in -slav, -mir, and -mil, it can become a female name by adding an A to the end.

Merkel (Silesian–German): Nickname for Markward, which ultimately descends from Ancient Germanic name Marcaward. Its roots are Celtic marca and Old High German marah (horse), or marka (border), and Old High German wart (guard).

Metfried (German): From roots maht (strength, might) and frid (peace).

Mezamir (Slavic): “Great boundary,” “Boundary of peace,” or “Boundary of the world,” from a Proto–Slavic root meaning “limit, boundary, landmark” (which evolved into Old Church Slavonic mežda), and mer (famous, great) or mir (peace, world).

Milogost (Slavic): “Gracious guest,” from roots milu (dear, gracioius) and gosti. The modern form is Miłogost (Polish).

Miqueu (Occitan): Form of Michael (Who is like God?). This is also the modern Gascon form.

Mundi (Swedish and Norman): Nickname for Old Norse Agmundr, derived from elements ag (edge of a sword) or agi (terror, awe), and mundr (protection).

Mundir (Moorish Arabic): “Cautioner, warner.”

Munio (Basque): The feminine form was Munia.

Mundzuk (Turkic): Possibly “bead, jewel,” from root mončuq.

The Ks of Medieval names

Female:

Kalisfena (Russian, Slavic): Form of Greek name Kallisthena (beautiful strength/power), from roots kallos (beautiful) and sthenos (might, power, strength, ability). Obviously, this is also the source of the word “calisthenics.”

Kanza (Moorish Arabic): “Treasure.” The modern form is Kenza.

Katixa (Basque): Possibly a form of Katherine.

Kedruta (Czech)

Kela (Yiddish)

Kokachin (Mongolian)

Kometitza (Basque): Possibly related to Medieval English name Comitessa, from Latin word comitissa (countess).

Kosenila (Russian, Slavic)

Kostantzia (Basque): Form of Constance.

Kristāna (Baltic): Probably a form of Christina.

Male:

Kaldor (German): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Chlodochar (famous army), from roots hlud (famous) and hari (army). Its best-known modern form is Lothar.

Kanutus (Swedish): Form of Knut, from Old Norse word knútr (knot).

Kartoka (Anglo–Scandinavian): Form of Kár-Tóki, from Old Norse root kárr (“curly-haired” or “reluctant, obstinant) and nickname Tóki (for names containing the element Þórr [Thor], “thunder”).

Kelagast (Slavic): The name of a 6th century nobleman. I couldn’t find a root for the first element, but the second seems to come from gost (guest).

Kelitia (English)

Khutughtu (Mongolian): “Blessed.”

Khuwaylid (Arabic): “Immortal, eternal,” from root ḵalada (to last forever, to be everlasting). This was the name of Prophet Mohammad’s first father-in-law.

Kitan (Silesian–German): Nickname for Kristian.

Kitman (Moorish Arabic)

Könika (Swedish): Nickname for Konrad, which descends from Old High German name Kuonrat. Its roots are kuoni (strong, brave, bold) and rât (counsel).

Korp (Swedish): “Raven,” from Old Norse word korpr.

Kovals (Baltic, Livonian): Possibly related to Livonian word koval (smart) or Slavonic kowal (blacksmith).

Kresimir (Slavic): “Spark of the world” and “spark of peace,” from roots kresu (spark, light, rouse) and miru (world, peace). Modern forms are Krzesimir (Polish) and Krešimir (Croatian).

Külüg (Mongolian): “Hero.”

Kürşat (Turkic): “Hero, valiant, brave.”