The Ses of Medieval names

Female:

Sabada (Basque): Possibly “Sabbath.”

Safya (Moorish Arabic): “Pure,” from root safi.

Saissa (Occitan)

Sajah (Arabic)

Salimah (Judeo–Arabic): “To be safe.”

Salomia (Italian): Form of Salomé (peace).

Salwa (Moorish Arabic): “Consolation.”

Sama (Moorish Arabic): “She became honoured, exalted.”

Sancta (Italian and French): “Holy, sacred, divine, pious, consecrated, just.”

Santesa (Italian): This is still used in modern Sardinian.

Sapience (Flemish): “Wisdom,” from a French word with that meaning. The Italian form was Sapienza, and the Occitan form was Sebienda.

Satara (Moorish Arabic): “One who covers.”

Scarlata (Italian): The masculine form was Scarlatto.

Sciencia (English)

Sedania (English): Form of Sidonia (from Sidon). In the Middle Ages, it became associated with the Greek word sindon (linen); i.e., the Shroud of Turin.

Sendina (Spanish)

Servanda (Spanish): “To protect, save, preserve,” from Latin root servandus.

Sestrid (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Ástríðr, with Old Norse roots áss (god) and fríðr (beautiful, belovèd). The familiar modern form is Astrid.

Setembrina (Italian): September.

Shifa (Arabic): “Remedy, cure, healing.”

Sibilia (Catalan, Occitan, Italian): “Female prophet, sibyl,” from Greek root sibylla.

Siggun (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Siggunnr, with roots sigr (victory) and gunnr (fight, battle).

Sighni (Danish and Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Signý (new victory), with roots sigr and .

Sireda (English): Possibly derived from Old Norse name Sigríðr (beautiful victory), with roots sigr and fríðr (beautiful, fair). It may also be a feminine form of Anglo–Saxon name Sigeræd, from Old English roots sige (victory) and ræd (counsel).

Smirenka (Russian and Slavic)

Sobeyrana (Occitan)

Solavita (Italian)

Soliana (Italian)

Solomonida (Russian and Slavic): “Peace,” from Hebrew root shalom.

Sosipatra (Russian and Slavic)

Spania (Occitan and Italian): Spain.

Sperança (Occitan): “Hope.”

Splendora (English): “Brilliance, lustre, brightness, distinction,” from Latin root splendor.

Sukayna (Moorish Arabic): “Cute, sprightly, adorable.”

Suna (Moorish Arabic): “Gold,” from a Persian word.

Sunnifa (Scandinavian): Derived from Old English name Sunngift (sun gift), from roots sunne and giefu. The modern form is Sunniva (Norwegian).

Sweetlove (English): From Old English roots swet (sweet) and lufu (love).

Male:

Sadoq (Judeo–Italian): “Righteous,” from Hebrew root tzadok.

Safwan (Moorish Arabic): “Rock.”

Salvi (Italian): “Unharmed, well, safe,” from Latin root salvus. This is still used in modern Catalan.

Santsol (Basque): Possibly “Saint Zoilus,” referring to a saint martyred in Córdoba. Its possible root is zoós (living, alive).

Saraceno (Italian): Saracen (i.e., a Muslim Arab).

Sebastie (Basque): Form of Sebastian (from Sebaste).

Sebbi (Danish): Nickname for Ancient Scandinavian name Sǽbiǫrn (sea bear), from roots sær and bjǫrn.

Selvi (Danish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Sialfi, from Old Norse root sjalfi (himself).

Sewolt (German)

Shorter (English): Exactly what it suggests. It was a nickname like Junior.

Sigfast (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Sigfastr (fast victory), from Old Norse roots sigr (victory) and fastr (fast, firmly).

Slavogost (Slavic and Croatian): “Guest’s glory,” from roots slava (glory) and gost.

Snio (Danish): Derived from Old Norse name Snær (snow).

Sobeslav (Slavic): “Glory for oneself,” from roots sebe (for oneself) and slava. The modern form is Sobiesław (Polish).

Splinter (Dutch): Possibly related to modern Dutch word splinter (exactly what it means in English).

Squire (English)

Stali (Danish), Stale (Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Stáli (steel), from root stál.

Stanfled (English)

Sture (Scandinavian): “To be contrary,” from Old Norse root stura.

Sulon (Breton): “Sun.”

Suni (Danish): “Son,” from Old Norse root sunr.

Svetoslav (Slavic): Hypothetical original form of Russian name Svyatopolk (blessèd people), from roots svetu (holy, blessèd) and pulku (people, army, host).

Svinimir (Slavic): Possibly from Proto–Slavic root svin’a (swine, pig) and Slavonic mir (world, peace). Others feel it’s an older form of Zvonimir (the sound of peace).

Syroslav (Slavic): Possibly from Proto–Slavic root širok (broad, wide) or Russian root syroy (raw), and Slavonic slav.

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The Ps of Medieval names

Male:

Palni (Danish): Possibly from Old Danish root pólina or páll (pole).

Pangratio (Italian)

Paregorio (Judeo–Italian)

Parsiprestre (Occitan)

Pätar (Swedish): Form of Peter (stone), from Greek root petros.

Predimir (Serbian and Croatian): Derived from Proto–Slavic root perd (against, in front of), and Slavic mir (peace, world) or mer (famous, great).

Predislav (Serbian and Croatian): From roots perd and slav (glory).

Premislav (Slavic): Possible form of modern Polish name Przemysł and modern Czech name Přemysl. Its roots are pre (over), mysli (idea, thought), and slav. Together, it means “stratagem, trick.”

Pribimir (Slavic): “Breaking peace/the world,” “More peace,” “Against peace/the world,” or “To help peace/the world.” The modern form is Przybymir (Polish).

Pribislav (Slavic): “Breaking glory,” “More glory,” “Against glory,” or “To help glory.” The modern form is Przybysław (Polish).

Pridbor (Slavic): “First battle,” from roots prid and borti. It found its way into Danish and Norwegian as Pridbjørn (modern form Preben).

Putimir (Slavic): “Path of peace/the world,” from roots pǫt (path, road, way) and mir.

Putislav (Slavic): “Path of glory.” from roots pǫt and slav.

Female:

Pacifica (Italian): “Peacemaker,” from Latin root pacificus.

Palmeria (Italian): “Pilgrim,” from Latin root palma (palm tree). Pilgrims to the Holy Land carried palm fronds home, to prove they’d gone there. The masculine form was Palmerio.

Pantasilea (Italian): Form of Greek name Penthesilea (to jeer at grief), from roots penthos (grief) and sillaino (to jeer at, to mock). This was the name of the Amazon queen.

Papera (Italian)

Parette (French)

Parnella (English): Derived from a contracted form of Petronel, the Middle English form of Petronilla. Its possible root is the Latin word petro, petronis (yokel). The name fell out of favour after the word “parnel” became slang for a promiscuous woman in the Late Middle Ages.

Pasquina (Italian)

Pavia (English): Possibly from Old French proper adjective Pavie (woman from Pavia, Italy), or Old French noun pavie (peach).

Pelegrina (Occitan)

Peretta (Italian)

Petrumīla (Baltic): Probably a form of Petra.

Petrussa, Peritza (Basque): Elaborated form of Petra. Other forms included Petrissa (German) and Perussia (French).

Piccarda (Italian): “From Picardy.”

Piruza (Italian)

Placia (Spanish)

Plazensa (Occitan)

Plezou (Breton): Possibly “little braid,” from roots plezh (braid) and ou (a diminutive suffix), or “female wolf,” from root bleiz.

Pollonia (Italian): Short form of Apollonia, derived from Apollo.

Posthuma (English): “Posthumous,” given as a middle name to girls whose fathers had died before their births. The masculine form was Posthumus.

Prangarda (Italian): From Ancient Germanic roots brand (sword) and gard (enclosure, protected place).

Preciosa (English, Judeo–Catalan, Ladino [Judeo–Spanish]): “Precious,” from Old French root precios and Latin pretiosa.

Pressedia (Italian): Form of Greek name Praxedes (accomplishment, success, a doing), from root praxis.

Primavera (Italian): “Spring.”

Proxima (English): “Closest, nearest,” from Latin root proximus.

Prudenzia (Italian): “Prudence,” from Latin root prudens.

The Ks of Medieval names

Female:

Kalisfena (Russian, Slavic): Form of Greek name Kallisthena (beautiful strength/power), from roots kallos (beautiful) and sthenos (might, power, strength, ability). Obviously, this is also the source of the word “calisthenics.”

Kanza (Moorish Arabic): “Treasure.” The modern form is Kenza.

Katixa (Basque): Possibly a form of Katherine.

Kedruta (Czech)

Kela (Yiddish)

Kokachin (Mongolian)

Kometitza (Basque): Possibly related to Medieval English name Comitessa, from Latin word comitissa (countess).

Kosenila (Russian, Slavic)

Kostantzia (Basque): Form of Constance.

Kristāna (Baltic): Probably a form of Christina.

Male:

Kaldor (German): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Chlodochar (famous army), from roots hlud (famous) and hari (army). Its best-known modern form is Lothar.

Kanutus (Swedish): Form of Knut, from Old Norse word knútr (knot).

Kartoka (Anglo–Scandinavian): Form of Kár-Tóki, from Old Norse root kárr (“curly-haired” or “reluctant, obstinant) and nickname Tóki (for names containing the element Þórr [Thor], “thunder”).

Kelagast (Slavic): The name of a 6th century nobleman. I couldn’t find a root for the first element, but the second seems to come from gost (guest).

Kelitia (English)

Khutughtu (Mongolian): “Blessed.”

Khuwaylid (Arabic): “Immortal, eternal,” from root ḵalada (to last forever, to be everlasting). This was the name of Prophet Mohammad’s first father-in-law.

Kitan (Silesian–German): Nickname for Kristian.

Kitman (Moorish Arabic)

Könika (Swedish): Nickname for Konrad, which descends from Old High German name Kuonrat. Its roots are kuoni (strong, brave, bold) and rât (counsel).

Korp (Swedish): “Raven,” from Old Norse word korpr.

Kovals (Baltic, Livonian): Possibly related to Livonian word koval (smart) or Slavonic kowal (blacksmith).

Kresimir (Slavic): “Spark of the world” and “spark of peace,” from roots kresu (spark, light, rouse) and miru (world, peace). Modern forms are Krzesimir (Polish) and Krešimir (Croatian).

Külüg (Mongolian): “Hero.”

Kürşat (Turkic): “Hero, valiant, brave.”

The Cs of Medieval names

Unisex:

Creature (English): “Living being,” from the Latin creatura. Given to infants who survived just long enough to be baptized. At least one such infant, female Creature Cheseman, survived into adulthood. Other forms were Creature-of-Christ and Creature-of-God.

Female:

Calomaria (Italian): “Beautiful Maria,” from the Greek kalos (beautiful) and the name Maria.

Caradonna (Judeo–Italian): “Precious lady,” from the Latin cara (precious, dear, beloved, costly, valued) and Italian donna (lady).

Chichäk (Khazar): “Flower.”

Christoffelina (Flemish): Feminine form of Christopher.

Coblaith (Irish): “Victorious sovereignty.”

Comitessa (English): “Countess,” from the Latin comitissa.

Corelia (Italian).

Crestienne (French): Christian.

Cristofana (Tuscan Italian): Feminine form of Christopher.

Male:

Calandro (Italian): “Beautiful man,” from the Greek kalos andros. The feminine form, Calandra, is a rarely-used modern name.

Chedomir (Slavic): “Child of peace” and “child of the world,” from roots chedo (child) and miru (world, peace). The modern form Čedomir is Macedonian, Serbian, and Croatian.

Conomor (Breton): Possibly derived from *Cunomāros, a Brythonic name which in turn derived from Common Celtic roots *kwon- (hound) or *kuno- (high), and *māros (great). This name was borne by 6th century King Conomor the Cursed, who appears as a villain in Breton folklore. He’s believed to be the inspiration for Bluebeard, and King Mark of Cornwall in the tale of Tristan and Isolde.

Costelin (English)

Cresconio (Spanish)

Cresques (Judeo–Provençal, Judeo–Catalan, Occitan): Form of Latin Crescens, from crescere (to grow). It also means “growing,” from Catalan adjective creixent and verb créixer (to grow). In Medieval Occitania, it was a form of the Hebrew Tzemach.

The Bs of Medieval names

Male:

Baghatur (Khazar): “Brave warrior.”

Bazkoare (Basque): Form of Pascal, which means Easter. The feminine form was Bazkoara.

Berislav (Slavic): “To take glory,” from roots birati (to gather, take) and slava (glory). This name is still used in modern Croatian.

Bernwulf (English): “Bear wolf,” from Ancient Germanic elements bero and wulf. Other forms were Berowolf, Berowulf, and Bernwelf.

Bogumir (Slavic): “Famous/great God,” “God’s peace,” and “God’s world,” from elements Bog (God) and miru (world; peace), or meru (famous, great). Modern forms are Bogomir (Slovenian) and Bohumír (Czech and Slovak).

Bratomil (Slavic): “Gracious/dear brother,” from elements bratu (brother) and milu (dear, gracious). The modern form Bratumił is Polish.

Buyantu (Mongolian): “Good, blessed.”

Female:

Banafsaj (Moorish Arabic): “Violet.”

Baraka (Moorish Arabic): “Blessing,”

Belcolore (Italian): “Beautiful colour,” from bel and colore. This is a Decameron name, in one of the more famously raunchy stories. I love all the double entendres about the mortar and pestle!

Bonafilia (Ladino [Judeo–Spanish], Judeo–Provençal, Judeo–Catalan): “Good daughter,” from Latin roots bona (good, noble, kind) and filia, This was often used as a superstitious amuletic name, to try to trick the Angel of Death and keep him away.

Bonajoia (Judeo–French): “Good joy,” from Old French roots bone joie.

Bonajuncta (Catalan): Form of Judeo–Catalan Bona-Aunis, from Latin root bona and Catalan root aunir (to unite).

Brightwyna (English): “Bright friend,” from Ancient Germanic roots beorht (clear, bright) and win (friend),