The Us of Medieval names

Female:

Umayma (Moorish Arabic): “Little mother.”

Umayna (Moorish Arabic): Form of Amina (feel safe; truthful).

Urraca (Spanish, Basque): “Magpie,” ultimately from Latin furax (thievish).

Ursola (Catalan): Form of Ursula (little bear)

Ustė (Baltic)

Ustilé (Baltic)

Male:

Uallach (Irish): “Pride,” from root uall.

Ubaid (Moorish Arabic): “Servant.”

Udder (Danish, Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Oddr (point of a sword), and the word otr (otter).

Uddolf (Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Uddulfr, from roots oddr and ulfr (wolf).

Ulfkil (Danish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Ulfkætill, from roots ulfr and ketill (cauldron, helmet, hat).

Ulfrik (Swedish, Danish): Derived from Old Norse name Ulfríkr, from roots ulfr and ríkr (mighty, rich, distinguished).

Ulvar (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Ulfarr/Ulfgæirr, from roots ulfr and geirr (spear), or herr (army).

Ungust (Cornish)

Unker (Danish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Óðinkárr. Its roots are either Old Danish othankar/othinkar (raging, easily furious), or Old Norse óðr (frenzy, rage, inspiration) and kárr (“obstinant; reluctant” or “curly-haired”).

Urdin (Basque): “Blue.” 

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The Gs of Medieval names

Female:

Gaila (Basque): Feminine form of Gailo.

Gaitelgrima (Italian): Also an Ancient Germanic–Lombardic name.

Galiana (Italian, German): Feminine form of Galian. The Medieval Occitan form was Galiane.

Gamitza (Basque)

Gazte (Basque): “Young.”

Gelleia (English)

Gelvira (Spanish)

Gervisa (Italian)

Gerwara (Danish): Either a form of unisex name Gerwar or a feminine form of Ancient Scandinavian name Gæirvarr. When Gerwar was used on a girl, it was a form of Ancient Scandinavian name Gæirvǫr (from roots geirr [spear] and vár [woman, spring]). On a boy, it was a form of Gæirvarr (from roots geirr and varr [wise; alert, shy, attentive).

Gherardesca (Italian)

Ghisolabella (Italian): Combination of Ghisola and bella (beautiful).  Ghisola was a form of Ancient Germanic name Gisila, whose modern form is the familiar Giselle). It derives from the word gisil (pledge, hostage). I completely fell in love with this name when I discovered it in The Divine Comedy.

Giralda (Occitan)

Girolama (Italian): Feminine form of Jerome, which derives from Greek name Hieronymus (sacred name). Its roots are hieros and onoma.

Gordislava (Russian, Slavic)

Gostansa (Catalan): Probably a form of Constance.

Male:

Galeazzo (Italian): Form of Galahad, via alternate form Galeas.

Galfrido (Italian): Form of Medieval Tuscan name Gualfredo, which derives from Ancient Germanic names Walahfrid and Walfrid. The roots of the former are the Ancient Germanic walha (stranger) and frid (peace), while the roots of the latter are the Gothic valdan (to reign) and Old High German fridu (peace).

Galib (Moorish Arabic): “Victor, winner.” The feminine form was Galiba.

Gangalando (Italian): Derived from an Ancient Germanic name with roots gang (path) and land (same meaning in English).

Garindo (Basque)

Garnier (French): Form of Werner, which derives from Ancient Germanic roots warin (guard) and hari (army).

Garsea (Spanish): Possibly derived from the Basque word hartz (bear).

Gatbay (Judeo–Catalan): Form of Hebrew name Gabbai, which possibly means “to dig.” In Aramaic, the word gabbai refers to a tax-collector, treasurer, or charity-collector.

Gelfrat (German): From High German roots gelf (boast, yelp) and rat (advice, counsel).

Gelmiro (Spanish)

Geragio (Italian)

Giuscard (Norman French): Form of Norman name Wischard, which derives from Old Norse roots viskr (wise) and hórðr (brave, hardy).

Gladman (English)

Glockrian, Glogryan (German): Form of Kalogreant, which derives from Arthurian name Calogrenant.

Glúniairn (Irish, Scandinavian): “Iron-kneed.”

Godlamb (English)

Goldhere (English)

Goldstan (English)

Gostislav (Slavic): “Guest’s glory,”  from roots gosti and slava.

Guildhelm (Dutch): Form of William, which derives from Ancient Germanic name Willahelm (roots wil [desire, will] and helm [helmet, protection]).

Gwenwynwyn (Welsh)

The Fs of Medieval names

Unisex:

Freewill (English)

Male:

Fadrique (Spanish): Form of Frederick (peaceful ruler), from Ancient Germanic elements frid (peace) and ric (power, ruler).

Farraj (Moorish Arabic): “Jubilant, happy, joyous.”

Farulf (Scandinavian): Derived from the Ancient Germanic root fara (journey), Gothic root faran (to travel), or Langobardic fara (family, kind, line), and the Ancient Germanic root wulf (wolf). This is also the Old Swedish form of the Old Norse Farulfr, in which case it would be derived from Old West Norse root fara (to travel, go), and related to Old Icelandic far (passage, ship).

Fasti (Danish): Derived from Old Norse root fast (firmly, fast).

Fatherling (English)

Fellow (English)

Ferrand (French, Occitan, Provençal): Form of Ferdinand, which derives from an Ancient Germanic name with roots fardi (journey) and nand (brave, daring). The Medieval Italian, Spanish, and Aragonese form was Ferrando.

Filimor (Anglo–Norman): “Very famous,” from Ancient Germanic elements filu (very, much) and meri (famous).

Freidank (German): “Free thought,” from roots frei and dank.

Frienday (English)

Frosti (Danish): Derived from Old Norse root frost (which means the same as it does in English). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology. The name is still used in modern Icelandic.

Female:

Falcona (Spanish): “Falcon,” from Old High German falco.

Faoiltighearna (Irish): “Wolf lady,” from roots faol and tighearna.

Fatyan (Moorish Arabic): “Seduction.”

Favia (Occitan)

Fazila (Arabic): “Generosity, grace

Fina (Occitan): Derived from Old French root fin (tender, delicate).

Fiva (Russian, Slavic): Form of Greek name Thebe.

Floria (English): Feminine form of Latin name Florius, which in turn derives from Florus (flower). The Medieval French form was Florie.

Frederuna (German): Older form of Friderun, derived from Old High German root fridu (peace) and Gothic root rûna (secret).

Fressenda (English): Older form of Frideswide, which descends from the Old English Friðuswiþ. Its roots are friþ (peace) and swiþ (strong).

The Ds of Medieval names

Male:

Deocar (French): “Loved by God,” from Latin Deocarus.

Dobrogost (Slavic): “Good guest,” from roots dobru and gosti. This is also a rare modern Polish name.

Dobromil (Slavic): “Good glory,” from roots dobru and slava. This is also a rare modern Czech name.

Dragomir (Slavic): “Precious world” and “precious peace,” from roots dragu and miru. This name is also used in modern Romanian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Russian, Slovenian, and Croatian. I absolutely love this name! My character Dragomir used the nickname Drashka. His parents, a deposed prince and princess, gave all their kids Medieval Slavic names in keeping with their own.

Dragoslav (Slavic): “Precious glory,” from roots dragu and slava. This name is also used in modern Serbian, Slovenian, and Croatian.

Female:

Daifa (Arabic)

Dalfina (Catalan): Presumably a form of the Latin Delphina, which derives from Delphinus (of Delphi). The name of the famous city of Delphi may derive from the Greek delphys (womb). This is also a rare modern Macedonian name.

Dalmatia (French): “From Dalmatia,” a historic region of Croatia.

Dhana (Moorish Arabic): “Smallness.”

Dionora, Dianora (Catalan, Italian, Spanish)

Divitia (Italian): “Riches, wealth,” from Latin word meaning the same.

Dubheasa (Irish): “Dark waterfull,” from Gaelic roots dubh and eas.

The Cs of Medieval names

Unisex:

Creature (English): “Living being,” from the Latin creatura. Given to infants who survived just long enough to be baptized. At least one such infant, female Creature Cheseman, survived into adulthood. Other forms were Creature-of-Christ and Creature-of-God.

Female:

Calomaria (Italian): “Beautiful Maria,” from the Greek kalos (beautiful) and the name Maria.

Caradonna (Judeo–Italian): “Precious lady,” from the Latin cara (precious, dear, beloved, costly, valued) and Italian donna (lady).

Chichäk (Khazar): “Flower.”

Christoffelina (Flemish): Feminine form of Christopher.

Coblaith (Irish): “Victorious sovereignty.”

Comitessa (English): “Countess,” from the Latin comitissa.

Corelia (Italian).

Crestienne (French): Christian.

Cristofana (Tuscan Italian): Feminine form of Christopher.

Male:

Calandro (Italian): “Beautiful man,” from the Greek kalos andros. The feminine form, Calandra, is a rarely-used modern name.

Chedomir (Slavic): “Child of peace” and “child of the world,” from roots chedo (child) and miru (world, peace). The modern form Čedomir is Macedonian, Serbian, and Croatian.

Conomor (Breton): Possibly derived from *Cunomāros, a Brythonic name which in turn derived from Common Celtic roots *kwon- (hound) or *kuno- (high), and *māros (great). This name was borne by 6th century King Conomor the Cursed, who appears as a villain in Breton folklore. He’s believed to be the inspiration for Bluebeard, and King Mark of Cornwall in the tale of Tristan and Isolde.

Costelin (English)

Cresconio (Spanish)

Cresques (Judeo–Provençal, Judeo–Catalan, Occitan): Form of Latin Crescens, from crescere (to grow). It also means “growing,” from Catalan adjective creixent and verb créixer (to grow). In Medieval Occitania, it was a form of the Hebrew Tzemach.