The many forms of Ferdinand

Explorer Ferdinand Magellan, ca. 1480–1521

I’ve long been fond of the name Ferdinand, in all its many forms. It’s such a timeless classic, one of those names that used to be somewhat more popular but was never Top 100. Its highest rank in the U.S. to date was #242 in 1882. The name’s popularity moved up and down over the years, and dropped from the Top 400 in 1919. In 1931, it dropped from the Top 500.

Over time, the name continued to drop further and further, with a few short periods out of the Top 1000 entirely. To date, its last hurrah on the U.S. Top 1000 was 1971, at #984.

In France, Ferdinand enjoyed more past popularity, and stood at #59 in 1900. It left the Top 100 in 1929, crept back in the next year, and then fell out again. Its last year with a ranking was 1964, at #407.

In Switzerland, Ferdinand was #90 in 1925, and in the former Czechoslovakia, it was Top 100 from at least 1935–49. Its highest rank was #60 in 1941. In 1952, it left the Top 100.

Ferdinand is used in English, German, Dutch, French, Czech, and Slovenian. The alternate form Ferdinánd is Hungarian, and Ferdínand is Icelandic. It comes from an Ancient Germanic name derived from the roots farð (journey), frið (peace), or frith (protection), and nanth (daring, brave) or nand (prepared, ready). The original form may have been Frithunanths or Ferdinanths.

Fernando Pessoa, prolific Portuguese writer, 1888–1935

Other forms of the name include:

1. Fernand is French and modern Russian.

2. Ferdinando is Italian.

3. Fernando is Spanish and Portuguese. The Spanish nickname is Nando.

4. Fernão is Portuguese.

5. Ferdynand is Polish.

6. Ferran is Catalan. The alternate form Ferrán is Aragonese.

7. Hernando is Spanish. The nickname is Hernán.

8. Nándor is Hungarian.

9. Ferdinandas is Lithuanian.

10. Ferdinands is Latvian.

French composer Fernand Halphen, 1872–1917

11. Ferdinant is Breton.

12. Ferrand is Occitan and Provençal.

13. Fredenando is Basque.

14. Herran is Gascon.

15. Vêrtinât is Greenlandic.

Archduchess Auguste Ferdinande of Austria, 1825–1864

Feminine forms:

1. Fernanda is Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese.

2. Ferdinanda is Italian and German.

3. Fernande is French.

4. Ferdinande is German and French.

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The Zs of Medieval names

Male:

Zakarriyya (Moorish Arabic): Form of Zachary (God remembers), derived from Hebrew name Zecharyah.

Zavida (Serbian): “To envy,” from root zavideti. It was superstitiously used to divert the evil eye from children. The rare modern Serbian name Zaviša descends from Zavida.

Zbignev (Slavic): “To dispel anger,” from roots zbyti and gnyevu. The modern forms are Zbigniew (Polish) and Zbygněv (Czech).

Zeisolf (German): “Tender wolf,” from roots zeiz and wolf.

Zhelimir (Slavic): Hypothetical form of modern Serbian and Croatian name Želimir (to desire peace). Its roots are zheleti (to wish, to desire) and miru (peace, world).

Zierick (Flemish)

Zilar (Basque): “Silver.”

Zilio (Tuscan Italian)

Zorzi (Tuscan Italian): Form of George (farmer).

Zuan (Venetian Italian): Form of John (God is gracious), from Hebrew name Yochanan. The feminine form was Zuana.

Zumurrud (Moorish Arabic): “Emerald,” from Persian root zumrud.

Female:

Zalema (Juedo–Catalan, Ladino [Judeo–Spanish]): Form of Arabic name Salimah (to be safe).

Zaneta (Tuscan Italian): Nickname for Giovanna (a feminine form of John).

Zanobi (Tuscan Italian): Form of Zenobia (life of Zeus).

Zelante (Tuscan Italian)

Zelva (Baltic)

Zezilia (Basque): Form of Cecilia (blind), from Latin root caecus.

Zianna (Basque)

Zita (Basque): “The lord, the master,” from Arabic root as-sayyid. The masculine form was Ziti. This is the source of El Cid’s name.

Zubayda (Judeo–Arabic): “Prime, élite, cream.”

Zubiya (Arabic): “Gazelle.”

Zuria (Basque): “White,” from root zuri.

Zymeria (German)

The Vs of Medieval names

Male:

Vauquelin (French): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Walchelin, from root walha (foreign).

Vecheslav (Slavic): “More glory,” from roots veche and slava. The familiar modern form is the Czech and Slovak Václav. Other forms are Wenceslas (Latinized), Vyacheslav (Russian and Ukrainian), Wacław and Więcesław (Polish), Ventseslav (Bulgarian), Venseslao (Italian), Venseslás (Spanish), Vencel (Hungarian), Wenzel (German), and Veaceslav (Romanian).

Velam (Swedish): Form of William, derived from Ancient Germanic name Willahelm. Its roots are wil (desire, will) and helm (protection, helmet).

Velasco (Spanish): Possibly “crow,” from a Basque word. The modern form is Vasco, a Spanish adjective meaning “Basque.”

Velimir (Slavic): “Great peace” and “great world,” from roots veli and miru. This name is still used in modern Serbian and Croatian.

Venerio (Italian): Derived from Venus (sexual desire, love).

Vesike (Baltic, Livonian): “Water,” from Livonian root •vesi.

Vigmund (Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Vígmundr, from roots víg (battle, fight) and mund (protection).

Vimund (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Vímundr, with roots  (home, sanctuary, temple) and mund (protection, hand).

Vitomir (Slavic): “Master of peace” and “master of the world,” from roots vit (lord, master) and miru. This name is still used in modern Slovenina, Serbian, and Croatian.

Volknand (German): “Brave people,” from Ancient Germanic roots folk (people) and nand (brave, daring).

Vratislav (Slavic): “To return glory,” from roots vratiti and slava. This name is still used in modern Czech and Slovak.

Female:

Valata (Baltic, Livonian): Of widely-disputed, uncertain etymology.

València (Catalan)

Värun (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Vírún, from roots  (temple, home, sanctuary) and rún (secret).

Vasara (Baltic, Livonian): Possibly derived from the Latvian word for “summer,” or the Finnish word for “hammer.”

Verdiana (Italian): Feminine form of Latin name Viridianus, derived from root viridis (green).

Verildis (Dutch): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Farahild, from Langobardic root fara (family, kind, line) or Gothic faran (to travel), and Old Norse hildr (battle).

Vermilia (Italian)

Viana (Catalan)

Viçenta (Portuguese), Vicenta (Catalan): “To conquer,” from Latin root vincere.

Vivendòta (Catalan)

The Ts of Medieval names

Male:

Taki (Danish): “Receiver, surety, guarantor,” from Old Danish root taka (to take).

Tancred (Norman), Tankard (English): Derived from an Ancient Germanic name meaning “thought and counsel,” from roots thank (thought) and râd (counsel).

Tasufin (Moorish Arabic)

Tedaldo, Teodaldo (Italian): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Theudewald, with Ancient Germanic root þeuþ (people) and Gothic valdan (to reign). This is the name of a Decameron character.

Tedrick (English): Derived from Ancient Germanic name Theodoric (ruler of the people), from roots theud (people) and ric (power, ruler).

Temüjin (Mongolian): “Of iron,” from Turkic root temür (iron). This was Genghis Khan’s original name.

Temür (Turkic): “Iron.”

Terkel (Danish): Derived from Old Norse name Þórketill (Thor’s cauldron), from roots Þórr (Thor; thunder) and ketill (cauldron). This is also the modern Danish form. The modern Swedish and Norwegian form is Torkel.

Theodred (English): Derived from Anglo–Saxon roots þeod (people) and ræd (counsel).

Thorbern, Thorbiorn (Swedish, Danish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name  Þórbiǫrn (thunder bear; Thor’s bear), from roots Þórr and bjǫrn.

Thorfinn (Scandinavian): Derived from Old Norse name Þórfinnr, with roots Þórr and Finnr (Laplander, Sami). I’m planning a future post devoted to the many names derived from Thor! There are far too many to cover here.

Tikhomir (Slavic): “Quiet peace” and “quiet world,” from roots tikhu (quiet) and miru (world, peace). The modern form is Tihomir (Macedonian, Bulgarian, Serbian, and Croatian).

Todros (Judeo–Catalan)

Toghon (Mongolian): “Pot.”

Trudbert (German): “Bright strength,” from roots thrud (strength) and bert (bright).

Tulir (Danish): Nickname for Old Norse name Þórlæifr (Thor’s descendant; thunder’s descendant). Its roots are Þórr and leif (heir, descendant, heritage).

Tumi (Danish): Nickname for names starting with Þórr/Thor, and containing M as their final element.

Tverdimir (Slavic): “Hard peace” and “hard world,” from Proto–Slavic root tverd (hard) and mir (world, peace). The modern form is Twardomir (Polish).

Female:

Tanguistl (Cornish), Tangwystl (Welsh), Thangustella (English): “Pledge of peace,” from Welsh roots tanc (peace, tranquility) and gwystl (hostage, pledge).

Tanzeda (Occitan)

Taudisca (Tuscan Italian), Tedesca (Italian): Derived from Proto–Germanic root *þiudiskaz (of the people, vernacular, popular). This is also the modern Italian feminine adjective for “German.”

Tegrida (Spanish): Form of Tigris, which may be of Celtic or Gallic origin.

Tekusa (Russian and Slavic): Form of Greek name Thekusa.

Temperantia (Italian)

Tessina (Italian)

Tortula (Italian): “Small twist.”

Tyfainne (French): “Epiphany,” from Greek root Theophania. This name was traditionally given to girls born on 6 January.

The Ses of Medieval names

Female:

Sabada (Basque): Possibly “Sabbath.”

Safya (Moorish Arabic): “Pure,” from root safi.

Saissa (Occitan)

Sajah (Arabic)

Salimah (Judeo–Arabic): “To be safe.”

Salomia (Italian): Form of Salomé (peace).

Salwa (Moorish Arabic): “Consolation.”

Sama (Moorish Arabic): “She became honoured, exalted.”

Sancta (Italian and French): “Holy, sacred, divine, pious, consecrated, just.”

Santesa (Italian): This is still used in modern Sardinian.

Sapience (Flemish): “Wisdom,” from a French word with that meaning. The Italian form was Sapienza, and the Occitan form was Sebienda.

Satara (Moorish Arabic): “One who covers.”

Scarlata (Italian): The masculine form was Scarlatto.

Sciencia (English)

Sedania (English): Form of Sidonia (from Sidon). In the Middle Ages, it became associated with the Greek word sindon (linen); i.e., the Shroud of Turin.

Sendina (Spanish)

Servanda (Spanish): “To protect, save, preserve,” from Latin root servandus.

Sestrid (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Ástríðr, with Old Norse roots áss (god) and fríðr (beautiful, belovèd). The familiar modern form is Astrid.

Setembrina (Italian): September.

Shifa (Arabic): “Remedy, cure, healing.”

Sibilia (Catalan, Occitan, Italian): “Female prophet, sibyl,” from Greek root sibylla.

Siggun (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Siggunnr, with roots sigr (victory) and gunnr (fight, battle).

Sighni (Danish and Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Signý (new victory), with roots sigr and .

Sireda (English): Possibly derived from Old Norse name Sigríðr (beautiful victory), with roots sigr and fríðr (beautiful, fair). It may also be a feminine form of Anglo–Saxon name Sigeræd, from Old English roots sige (victory) and ræd (counsel).

Smirenka (Russian and Slavic)

Sobeyrana (Occitan)

Solavita (Italian)

Soliana (Italian)

Solomonida (Russian and Slavic): “Peace,” from Hebrew root shalom.

Sosipatra (Russian and Slavic)

Spania (Occitan and Italian): Spain.

Sperança (Occitan): “Hope.”

Splendora (English): “Brilliance, lustre, brightness, distinction,” from Latin root splendor.

Sukayna (Moorish Arabic): “Cute, sprightly, adorable.”

Suna (Moorish Arabic): “Gold,” from a Persian word.

Sunnifa (Scandinavian): Derived from Old English name Sunngift (sun gift), from roots sunne and giefu. The modern form is Sunniva (Norwegian).

Sweetlove (English): From Old English roots swet (sweet) and lufu (love).

Male:

Sadoq (Judeo–Italian): “Righteous,” from Hebrew root tzadok.

Safwan (Moorish Arabic): “Rock.”

Salvi (Italian): “Unharmed, well, safe,” from Latin root salvus. This is still used in modern Catalan.

Santsol (Basque): Possibly “Saint Zoilus,” referring to a saint martyred in Córdoba. Its possible root is zoós (living, alive).

Saraceno (Italian): Saracen (i.e., a Muslim Arab).

Sebastie (Basque): Form of Sebastian (from Sebaste).

Sebbi (Danish): Nickname for Ancient Scandinavian name Sǽbiǫrn (sea bear), from roots sær and bjǫrn.

Selvi (Danish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Sialfi, from Old Norse root sjalfi (himself).

Sewolt (German)

Shorter (English): Exactly what it suggests. It was a nickname like Junior.

Sigfast (Swedish): Derived from Ancient Scandinavian name Sigfastr (fast victory), from Old Norse roots sigr (victory) and fastr (fast, firmly).

Slavogost (Slavic and Croatian): “Guest’s glory,” from roots slava (glory) and gost.

Snio (Danish): Derived from Old Norse name Snær (snow).

Sobeslav (Slavic): “Glory for oneself,” from roots sebe (for oneself) and slava. The modern form is Sobiesław (Polish).

Splinter (Dutch): Possibly related to modern Dutch word splinter (exactly what it means in English).

Squire (English)

Stali (Danish), Stale (Swedish): Derived from Old Norse name Stáli (steel), from root stál.

Stanfled (English)

Sture (Scandinavian): “To be contrary,” from Old Norse root stura.

Sulon (Breton): “Sun.”

Suni (Danish): “Son,” from Old Norse root sunr.

Svetoslav (Slavic): Hypothetical original form of Russian name Svyatopolk (blessèd people), from roots svetu (holy, blessèd) and pulku (people, army, host).

Svinimir (Slavic): Possibly from Proto–Slavic root svin’a (swine, pig) and Slavonic mir (world, peace). Others feel it’s an older form of Zvonimir (the sound of peace).

Syroslav (Slavic): Possibly from Proto–Slavic root širok (broad, wide) or Russian root syroy (raw), and Slavonic slav.