Names invoking anger

Though many Slavic names are formed from the beautiful roots miru (peace, world), milu (dear, gracious), slava (glory), lyuby (love), and tsvet/cvet/cvjet/kvet (flower), there’s a rather curious group of names with the root gnyevu/gnev (anger). Almost all of these names are Polish, and, to the best of my knowledge, are rare in modern usage. I suppose they date from an era when the various Slavic peoples were much more warlike.

Dobiegniew means “brave/courageous anger.”

Gniewomir means “anger and peace,” a very juxtaposing image. Nicknames include Gniewko and Gniewosz.

Gniewosław means “anger and glory,” another very juxtaposing image.

Izbygniew means “to dismiss/dispose of anger” or “room/hut of anger.”

Jarogniew means “fierce/energetic anger.”

Lutogniew means “fierce/cruel/wild/severe anger.” The Old Slavic word lut is also related to Luty, the Polish nickname for February. That month indeed is very cruel and fierce in Poland, weather-wise.

Mścigniew means “to avenge anger.”

Ostrogniew means “sharp anger.”

Spycigniew means “pointless/futile/unnecessary anger.”

Toligniew may mean “to silence/calm/soothe anger.”

Wojgniew means “soldier of anger” or “soldier’s anger.”

Wszegniew means “always angry” or “all anger.”

Zbigniew means “to dispel anger.” Nicknames include Zbyszek, Zbyszko, Zbysiek, and Zbysio. The Czech form is Zbygněv, with the nickname Zbyněk. This seems to be by far the most popular and common of these names.

Żeligniew means “to crave/long for/thirst for/hanker after anger.”