Place names beyond the Top 100

Popular place names as baby names in the U.S. currently include Savannah (#38), Austin (#73), London (a high of #85 in 2013, now #131), Lydia (#80), and Brooklyn (#34).

Other formerly trendy place names, which now aren’t so popular, include ChinaAsiaIndiaVirginia (high of #6 in 1921; fell out of the Top 100 in 1960; now down to #515), Odessa (high of #278 in 1908–09; last charted in 1956), Adelaide (high of #181 in 1884; fell out of the Top 1000 in 1949; re-entered in 2005; up to #258 in 2016), Georgia (high of #81 in 1882; #226 in 2016). and Florence (Top 10 from 1886–1906, with a high of #6 five of those years).

Some interesting place names which are a bit more under the radar, which I feel work very well as people names, include:

Female:

Vienna, or Vienne

Caledonia

Alberta

Geneva

Sahara (means “desert” in Arabic)

Valencia

Verona

Arizona

Andorra

Oradea

Marghita

Anina

Andalusia

Philadelphia

Venezia

Catania

Modena

Alfena

Amadora

Catalonia

Valletta

Arcadia

Egypt

Eleadora

Abilene

Mercia

Avalon

Brittania

Burgundy

Cambria

Carmel

Europa

Iona

Isauria, or Isaura

Petra (Also a feminine form of Peter, in addition to a city in Jordan. The name is #2 in Croatia, #26 in Hungary, #31 in Bosnia, #73 in the Czech Republic, and #93 in Portugal.)

Rona, or Rhona (means “rough island” in Scottish)

Shiloh

Siena, or Sienna (#236 in the U.S., #32 in New Zealand, #20 in Australia, #28 in England and Wales, #68 in Scotland and Canada, #53 in Northern Ireland, and #71 in Ireland)

Skye (one of those names I can only picture working on just the right person, in this case someone with very fair features and an ethereal, super-sweet disposition)

Zaria

Male:

York

Orlando

Palermo

Milano

Everest

Caspian

Troy

Jericho

Cyprian

Gilead (means “monument of testimony” in Hebrew)

Lennox (possibly means “place of elms” in Scottish)

Merritt (means “boundary gate” in Old English)

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Owl names

Continuing with the theme of names related to Halloween, here are some names whose meaning relates to the word “owl.”

Male:

Jarli means “barn owl” in Jiwarli, an indigenous Australian language.

Kamuy was the god of owls and the land in Ainu (Ancient Japanese) mythology. He’s depicted as a great owl. This is a very rare name in modern Japan.

Mupitsukupʉ means “old owl” in Comanche.

Otos means “horned owl” in Greek.

Ruru means “owl” in Maori.

Tokori means “screech owl” in Hopi.

Female:

Mis-stan-stur means “owl woman” in Cheyenne.

Ugla means “owl” in Icelandic. This is a modern, not traditional name.

Ugluspegill means “owl mirror” in Icelandic. This is a rare modern name.

Apple names

Continuing with this month’s theme of names related to the symbols of Halloween and/or October, here’s a list of names whose meanings relate to the word “apple.” Almost all of the names I discovered are Japanese. I tried to leave out most of the Japanese names which are names in other cultures but completely unrelated etymologically, like Marianna, Moana, Mona, and Anna.

Unless otherwise noted, all the names are Japanese.

Unisex:

Chamomile, though a herb used for tea, literally means “earth apple” in Greek.

Hinami can mean, among many other things, “beautiful apple tree fruit.”

Izana can mean, roughly, “thin silk clothing of the apple tree.”

Kanaru can mean, roughly, “poetry/song of the lapis lazuli apple tree.”

Naiki can mean “apple tree queen/princess,” “apple tree radiance,” “rare apple tree,” “genuine apple tree,” “apple tree longevity,” and “apple tree shine.”

Omena means “apple” in Finnish.

Pomaikalani may mean “apple of the heavens” in Hawaiian.

Ringo can mean “apple” and “peace be with you.” Given the strong association with Ringo Starr in the Anglophone world, I’d recommend this more for a pet’s name.

Senna can mean “deep red apple tree,” “a thousand apple trees,” “immortal apple tree,” “transcendent apple tree,” “fairy apple tree,” and “celestial being apple tree.”

Female:

Abhlach means “of the apples” or “plain of apples” in Irish.

Aeracura was a Roman goddess of Celtic origin, associated with Proserpina and Dis Pater. As a Celtic goddess, she may have been an earth goddess whose symbols included an apple basket and cornucopia. The name may mean “copper/bronze/wealth/money mistress.”

Akana can mean “deep red apple tree,” “crimson apple tree,” and “vermillion apple tree.”

Almabikä is a Bashkir name, whose first element, alma, means “apple.”

Almila means “red apple” in Turkish.

Amena can mean “candy apple tree.”

Ana can mean “second apple tree,” “quiet apple tree,” and “apple tree peace.”

Annamomoka can mean “apple tree flower.”

Atsuna can mean “second apple tree.”

Ayuna can mean, among many other things, “scarlet evening apple tree,” “peaceful apple tree friend,” and “second apple tree dream.”

Erena can mean “beautiful apple tree poem,” “beautiful apple tree blessing,” and “picture of a beautiful apple tree.”

Fumina can mean “apple tree sentence.”

Fuuna can mean “apple tree wind.”

Gurina can mean “apple tree and pear shrine.”

Harukana can mean “distant/remote apple tree.”

Harunako can mean “spring apple tree child.”

Hibikana can mean “beautiful apple tree sound.”

Hinako, among many other things, can mean “scarlet apple tree child,” “queen/princess apple tree rainbow,” and “beauty of the apple tree happiness.”

Honami can mean “to protect the apple tree.”

Isana can mean “brave apple tree.”

Izuna is a very rare name which can mean “fountain of wild apples.”

Joanna can mean “to seem like an apple tree.”

Jurina can mean “apple tree profit.”

Kaena can mean “summer apple tree benefit,” “to increase the benefit of the apple tree,” and “summer painting of the apple tree.”

Kamina can mean “birch reality of the apple tree.”

Kanasa can mean “beautiful apple tree blossom.”

Kanata can mean “beautiful, numerous wild apples.” Depending upon the kanji, it can also be unisex or masculine.

Karena can mean “beautiful tinkling of jade apple tree” and “fragrant tinkling of jade apple tree.”

Karina can mean “beautiful village apple tree,” “beautiful summer apple tree,” and “song of the lovely apple tree.”

Keina can mean “apple tree view” and “beautiful apple tree.”

Kenna can mean “intelligent apple tree” and “silk apple tree.”

Kiena can mean “century apple tree.”

Kikuna can mean “chrysanthemum apple tree.”

Kimina can mean “apple tree noble.”

Kiyona can mean “rejoice at generations of apple trees.”

Kona can mean “yellow apple tree,” “apple tree fragrance,” and “small apple tree.”

Konami can mean “beautiful apple tree lake,” “beautiful apple tree fruit,” and “beautiful apple tree ocean.”

Kurena can mean “crimson apple tree” and “summer crimson apple tree.”

Kyona can mean “red apple.”

Madona can mean “round apple tree.”

Mahina can mean “genuine apple tree empress.”

Manaka can mean “true flower of the apple tree” and “ten thousand wild apples’ fruit.”

Manamina can mean, roughly, “love of a beautiful apple tree.”

Marina can mean “true village apple tree.”

Miana can mean “soul of a second apple tree.”

Mikina can mean “tree trunk of an apple tree,” “fruit of a beautiful apple tree,” and “soul of a majestic apple tree.”

Mikuna can mean “beautiful nine apple trees.”

Monaka can mean “apple tree sprout fragrance.”

Monami can mean “luxuriant wild apple fruit.”

Na can mean “apple tree.”

Nabi can mean “beautiful apple tree.”

Nadzuna can mean “to pluck greens from an apple tree.”

Nagiha can mean “apple tree shrub leaf.”

Naia can mean “apple tree compared to Asia.”

Naira can mean “lightweight fabric clothing of an apple tree.”

Nairo can mean “apple tree colour.”

Nakoto can mean “apple tree koto [harp-like instrument].”

Namimi can mean “apple tree seed’s seed.”

Namino can mean “my apple tree harvest” and “beautiful apple tree field.”

Nanagi can mean “calm apple tree.”

Nanana can mean “apple tree vegetable apple tree.”

Nanaru can mean “apple tree’s apple tree stays.”

Natari can mean “gentle, glassy apple tree.”

Natsuno can mean “my apple tree moon” and “apple tree haven field.”

Nau can mean “apple tree poetry.”

Nazuna can mean “apple tree sand” and “apple tree metropolis apple tree.”

Nichina can mean “to know kindness of the apple tree.”

Nina can mean “two apple trees.”

Olma means “apple” in Uzbek.

Paannsee means “apple” in Burmese.

Pomellina means “little apple” in Medieval Italian.

Pommeline means “little apple” in French.

Reana can mean “beautiful colour of the apple tree.”

Renami can mean “beautiful tinkling of jade apple tree.”

Renona can mean “my apple tree command.”

Riena can mean “painting of a village apple tree.”

Rinako can mean “glassy apple tree child.”

Riona can mean “plum, cherry blossom, apple tree.”

Ririna can mean ” plum, pear, apple tree.”

Ritsuna can mean “chestnut tree, apple tree.”

Rubina can mean “to flow by a beautiful apple tree.”

Rumina can mean “water flows by apple tree.”

Runa can mean “apple tree moon.”

Sakuna can mean “apple tree blossom.”

Senako can mean “holy apple tree child” and “world apple tree soul.”

Serina can mean “west village apple tree.”

Shinna can mean “genuine apple tree.”

Shizuna can mean “apple tree’s aspiration to long life.”

Sorana can mean “sky apple tree.”

Sukina can mean “long life apple tree princess.”

Suna can mean “pleasing apple tree.”

Tekina can mean “suitable apple tree.”

Tsudzuna can mean “moon’s moon apple tree.”

Wawana can mean “apple tree peace flower.”

Yanako can mean “long time apple tree child.”

Yoshina can mean “virtuous apple tree.”

Yumina can mean “apple tree archery.”

Yuzuna can mean “grapefruit, apple tree.”

Corny, wheaten names

To continue with October’s theme of names relating to the symbols of Halloween, here’s a list of names related to the words “wheat” and “corn.”

Unisex:

Cinteotl, also known as Centeotl and Centeocihuatl, was the Aztec god of maize (i.e., corn). On some occasions, this deity had both male and female attributes The name means “corn deity.” Shortened forms of the name include Centli and Cintli, meaning “corn.”

Female:

Annonaria means “she who supplies corn” in Latin, derived primarily from annona (yearly produce; corn, grain; crop, harvest) and ultimately from annus (year). As an aspect of the goddes Fortuna, she brought luck to the harvest, particularly that of corn.

Arista means “ear of corn” in Latin. This is also the name of a star in the constellation Virgo.

Başak means “ear of wheat” in Turkish. This is also their name for the constellation Virgo.

Fortuna was the Roman goddess who protected corn supplies. The name means “fortune.”

Himugi can mean “day wheat” and “sun wheat” in Japanese.

Onatah is one of the Three Sisters in Iroquois mythology. She represents the spirit of corn, and her two sisters represent beans and squash.

Shala was a Mesopotamian corn goddess.

Sunbul means “ear of corn” or “ear of wheat” in Arabic.

Taraa means “wheat” in Tuvan.

Xilonen was the Aztec maize goddess.

Male:

Byggvir means “seed corn” in Old Norse.

Eustachys means “fruitful” in Greek, derived from eu (good) and stachus (ear of corn).

Gari is a rare Basque name meaning “wheat.”

Hokoleskwa means “corn stalk” in Shawnee.

Kaiyatahee means “corn tassel” in Cherokee.

Omer means “sheaf of wheat” in Hebrew.

Pitirim is the Russian form of the Greek Pithyrion, which primarily derives from pituron or pityron (husks of corn, bran), and ultimately derives from pitura or pityra (bran). It’s also possible Pithyrion derives from a Coptic name or word.

Stachys means “an ear of corn, a head of grain” in Greek.

Suddhodana means “pure/true corn” and “pure/true rice” in Sanskrit.

Dusty, screaming, shrieking names

Continuing with the theme of Halloween-type names, here are some names whose meanings relate to the words “dust,” “scream,” and “shriek.”

Unisex:

Kiran means “dust,” “sunbeam,” and “thread” in Sanskrit.

Male:

Aldonas is a rare Lithuanian name possibly derived from the Old Lithuanian ver aldoti (to scream, to shout, to make noise), combined with the patronymical suffix onis.

Emathion means “sandy” in Greek, derived from emathoeis, which in turn is derived from amathos (dust, sand, sandy soil).

Galarr means “screamer” in Old Norse.

Gillingr roughly means “son of a scream” or “belonging to a scream” in Old Norse.

Hawar means “to scream” in Sorani, a Kurdish language.

Kanzou can mean “three screams,” “storehouse of screams,” “to hide a scream,” “to own a scream,” “scream structure,” “scream physique,” and “to make a scream” in Japanese.

Kekrops means “screaming voice” in Greek.

Kyousei can mean, roughly, “to scream at a star” or “star scream” in Japanese.

Female:

Agasaya may mean “shrieker.” She was an early Semitic goddess of war, who later merged into Ishtar as the warrior of the sky.

Aphra, or Aphrah, is both a variation of a Latin nickname for an African woman and a variation of Afrah, a Biblical place name meaning “dust.” Aphrah is the common Anglicization of the Hebrew Afrah.

Himei can mean “scream” and “shriek” in Japanese.