The Cs of Medieval names

Unisex:

Creature (English): “Living being,” from the Latin creatura. Given to infants who survived just long enough to be baptized. At least one such infant, female Creature Cheseman, survived into adulthood. Other forms were Creature-of-Christ and Creature-of-God.

Female:

Calomaria (Italian): “Beautiful Maria,” from the Greek kalos (beautiful) and the name Maria.

Caradonna (Judeo–Italian): “Precious lady,” from the Latin cara (precious, dear, beloved, costly, valued) and Italian donna (lady).

Chichäk (Khazar): “Flower.”

Christoffelina (Flemish): Feminine form of Christopher.

Coblaith (Irish): “Victorious sovereignty.”

Comitessa (English): “Countess,” from the Latin comitissa.

Corelia (Italian).

Crestienne (French): Christian.

Cristofana (Tuscan Italian): Feminine form of Christopher.

Male:

Calandro (Italian): “Beautiful man,” from the Greek kalos andros. The feminine form, Calandra, is a rarely-used modern name.

Chedomir (Slavic): “Child of peace” and “child of the world,” from roots chedo (child) and miru (world, peace). The modern form Čedomir is Macedonian, Serbian, and Croatian.

Conomor (Breton): Possibly derived from *Cunomāros, a Brythonic name which in turn derived from Common Celtic roots *kwon- (hound) or *kuno- (high), and *māros (great). This name was borne by 6th century King Conomor the Cursed, who appears as a villain in Breton folklore. He’s believed to be the inspiration for Bluebeard, and King Mark of Cornwall in the tale of Tristan and Isolde.

Costelin (English)

Cresconio (Spanish)

Cresques (Judeo–Provençal, Judeo–Catalan, Occitan): Form of Latin Crescens, from crescere (to grow). It also means “growing,” from Catalan adjective creixent and verb créixer (to grow). In Medieval Occitania, it was a form of the Hebrew Tzemach.

The Bs of Medieval names

Male:

Baghatur (Khazar): “Brave warrior.”

Bazkoare (Basque): Form of Pascal, which means Easter. The feminine form was Bazkoara.

Berislav (Slavic): “To take glory,” from roots birati (to gather, take) and slava (glory). This name is still used in modern Croatian.

Bernwulf (English): “Bear wolf,” from Ancient Germanic elements bero and wulf. Other forms were Berowolf, Berowulf, and Bernwelf.

Bogumir (Slavic): “Famous/great God,” “God’s peace,” and “God’s world,” from elements Bog (God) and miru (world; peace), or meru (famous, great). Modern forms are Bogomir (Slovenian) and Bohumír (Czech and Slovak).

Bratomil (Slavic): “Gracious/dear brother,” from elements bratu (brother) and milu (dear, gracious). The modern form Bratumił is Polish.

Buyantu (Mongolian): “Good, blessed.”

Female:

Banafsaj (Moorish Arabic): “Violet.”

Baraka (Moorish Arabic): “Blessing,”

Belcolore (Italian): “Beautiful colour,” from bel and colore. This is a Decameron name, in one of the more famously raunchy stories. I love all the double entendres about the mortar and pestle!

Bonafilia (Ladino [Judeo–Spanish], Judeo–Provençal, Judeo–Catalan): “Good daughter,” from Latin roots bona (good, noble, kind) and filia, This was often used as a superstitious amuletic name, to try to trick the Angel of Death and keep him away.

Bonajoia (Judeo–French): “Good joy,” from Old French roots bone joie.

Bonajuncta (Catalan): Form of Judeo–Catalan Bona-Aunis, from Latin root bona and Catalan root aunir (to unite).

Brightwyna (English): “Bright friend,” from Ancient Germanic roots beorht (clear, bright) and win (friend),