The Os of Estonian names

Female:

Õie means “flower.” In Estonian, Õ is its own separate letter, not just an O with a tilde.

Oktjabrina is borrowed from the Russian name Oktyabrina, which was most popular in the early decades of the the USSR. It means “October.”

Oksana is borrowed from Ukrainian. It’s a form of Xenia (hospitality). In 2019, it was Estonia’s 74th most popular female name.

Olesja is borrowed from the Ukrainian name Olesya, which is a diminutive of Oleksandra (defending humanity). This name is fairly popular in Estonia.

Õnne means “happiness; luck.” The longer form is Õnnela. The male Finnish form is Onni.

Õnneleid means “good luck.”

Male:

Odart is an archaic name borrowed from Old High German and Old Saxon, meaning “strong riches/wealth.”

Oleg is adopted from Russian, and ultimately derives from Old Norse name Helgi (blessed; holy). In 2018, this was Estonia’s 15th most popular male name.

Õnnepäev means “day of luck.”

Oskar is borrowed from German and the Scandinavian languages. It may mean “deer friend” or “God’s spear.”

Osvald is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages, and means “God’s power.”

Ott may be an Estonian form of Otto (fortune; wealth), or taken from an Old Estonian word meaning “bear.”

The Gs of Estonian names

Female:

Gaidi means “wait.” The similar name Gaida means “waiting.”

Gerda is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages, and means “enclosure.” Gerd was a fertility goddess.

Gertrud is borrowed from German, and means “spear of strength.”

Gertu may be a nickname for Margit (pearl), now used as an independent name.

Gisela is borrowed from German, and means “pledge, hostage.”

Gita is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages, and originated as a nickname for Birgitta, which is either a form of Bridget (exalted one) or female form of Birger (help, rescue, save).

Male:

Gennadi is borrowed from the Russian name Gennadiy, and ultimately derives from Greek name Gennadios (generous, noble). It was #98 in Estonia as of 2018.

German (pronounced with a hard G) is borrowed from Russian, and derives from Latin name Germanus (brother).

Gleb is borrowed from Russian and in turn derives from Old Norse Guðleifr (God’s heir).

Grigori is borrowed from the Russian name Grigoriy and ultimately derives from the Greek name Gregorios (alert, watchful).

Gunnar is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages, and means “war warrior.” This is a cognate of Günther.

Gustav is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages and German. It either comes from Old Norse name Gautstafr (staff of the Goths) or Slavic name Gostislav (glorious guest).

The Es of Estonian names

Female:

Egle is borrowed from Latvian Eglė (spruce tree).

Eha means “dusk.”

Elve means “principle.”

Endla is the name of a lake which prominently features in folk poetry. It derives from Medieval names Ent and Endo, which may be diminutives of Hendrik or Andres. The male version is Endel.

Eneli may come from a Medieval nickname for Hendrika combined with the -li- syllable from Eliisabet.

Ere means “bright.”

Male:

Einar is adopted from Old Norse, and means “one warrior” or “warrior alone.”

Eino is also a Finnish name, and derives from Germanic roots agin (point/edge of a weapon) and wald (rule). It came back into vogue in the 19th century.

Elar, or Elari, has an etymology I couldn’t find.

Elmar is adopted from German, and means “famous blade.”

Erko is a form of Erik (ever ruler).

Evald is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages, and means “law/custom and rule.”

The Ds of Estonian names

Male:

Danil, or Daniel, come from Hebrew and means “God is my judge.” Though the native Estonian form is Taaniel, these spellings are also fairly popular.

Demid is borrowed from Russian. It’s a form of Diomedes (to think of Zeus).

Demjan derives from Greek name Damianos (to tame).

Dmitri is borrowed from the Russian Dmitriy, which in turn derives from the Greek Demetrios and ultimately the female name Demeter (which possibly means “earth mother”). This is currently the ninth-most popular male name in Estonia.

Donat is borrowed from the Slavic languages, Latvian, and Lithuanian. It means “given.”

Dzintar is borrowed from Latvian. It means “amber.”

Female:

Dace is borrowed from Latvian. It was originally a diminutive of Dārta, which is a form of Dorothea (gift of God). Today it’s an independent name.

Dagmar is borrowed from the Scandinavian languages. It means “day maid.”

Daiga is also borrowed from Latvian. It may mean “sprout, immature plant.”

Daile means “fine art.”

Dea is most likely borrowed from Danish in this case, as what was originally a nickname for Dorothea. It also means “goddess” in Latin.

Dinara is borrowed from Russian, Tatar, Kazakh, Bashkir, and Kyrgyz. This gorgeous but rare name may be derived from the dinar coin, or it could come from the Arabic word din (religion).

The Cs of Estonian names

Sorry, only female names today! Though I always prefer to feature names from both sexes and alternate which goes first, in the interest of fairness, I couldn’t find a single male Estonian name starting with C, even adoptions from other languages. If you know of any, let me know in the comments, and I’ll gladly add them!

Carola was adopted from Swedish and German. It’s a feminine form of Karl, which either means “man” or “warrior; army.”

Cärolin/Carolin was adopted from German. See above.

Cecilia was adopted from German, Finnish, and the Scandinavian and Romance languages. It means “blind.” This is a quite unusual name in Estonia.

Celia was adopted from the Romance languages. It’s quite uncommon, though slightly more popular than Cecilia. The name means “heaven.”

Charlotta is an extremely rare name adopted from Swedish. This is also a feminine form of Karl.

Christin was adopted from German and the Scandinavian languages. It’s a form of Christina, the feminine version of Christian (whose meaning should be beyond self-explanatory!).