The many forms of Robert

Robert is a perennially popular, timeless classic, the likes of David or Charles. It’s never been out of the Top 100 in the U.S. since records started in 1880. It was #10 when name records began being kept, and, except for being #11 in 1881, was in the Top 10 until 1988. Robert was in the Top 5 for many of those years. From 1924–39, and in 1953, it was #1. For the last few years, it’s held steady in the lower 60s. It was #62 in 2016.

The name is also currently popular in Romania (#15), Iceland (#31), Ireland (#54), Hungary (#55), Scotland (#59), Croatia (#70), and Poland (#71).

Robert is used in English, French (pronounced Ro-BEHR), the Scandinavian languages, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovenian, Romanian, and Croatian. The variation Róbert is Hungarian, Slovak, and Icelandic.

The name’s origin is the Old Germanic Hrodebert, “bright fame,” derived from the elements hrod (fame) and beraht (bright). It was introduced to England by the Normans, as a replacement for the Old English Hreodbeorht.

Other forms of the name include:

1. Roberto is Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese.

2. Robertas is Lithuanian.

3. Robrecht is Dutch.

4. Roberts is Latvian.

5. Ruprecht is German.

6. Roparzh is Breton.

7. Roibeárd is Irish.

8. Raibeart is Scottish.

9. Roopertti is Finnish. Nicknames include Pertti and Roope.

10. Robat is Welsh.

11. Robe is Sami.

12. Robearta is also Sami.

13. Robertos is Greek.

14. Rovertus is an alternate Greek form.

15. Robertus is Dutch. A Latinized form like this would only be used on official documents, not in everyday life.

16. Rudbert is West Frisian.

17. Rûperte is Greenlandic.

18. Lopaka is Hawaiian.

19. Hopcyn is a Welsh nickname.

20. Dobbin is a Medieval English nickname.

21. Dobinet is another Medieval English nickname.

22. Hobelot is also Medieval English.

23. Robelot is Medieval English too. I obviously wouldn’t recommend this one in modern English, since it sounds like “rob a lot.”

24. Hob is also Medieval English.

25. Hopkin is yet another Medieval English nickname. Many of their diminutives don’t appear to make any sense to contemporaries, but they’re not so difficult to understand if one knows it was common to substitute letters; e.g., Bob from Rob, Peg from Meg, Dick from Rick.

26. Rhobert is the more formal Welsh form.

Feminine forms:

1. Roberta is English, Spanish, and Italian.

2. Roberte is French.

3. Ruberta is an alternate English, Dutch, and German form.

4. Roverta is Greek.

2 thoughts on “The many forms of Robert

  1. Pingback: Bright names | Onomastics Outside the Box

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